Sunday, January 29, 2023

Can Chronic Hepatitis B Go Away

What Is Chronic Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B: Treatment and care for a chronic condition

Doctors refer to hepatitis B infections as either acute or chronic:

  • An acute HBV infection is a short-term illness that clears within 6 months of when a person is exposed to the virus.
  • A person who still has HBV after 6 months is said to have a chronic hepatitis B infection. This is a long-term illness, meaning the virus stays in the body and causes lifelong illness. An estimated 850,000 to more than 2 million people in the U.S. have chronic HBV.

The younger someone is when infected, the greater the chances for chronic hepatitis B.

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Whats The Outlook For People With Chronic Hep B

The majority of people who have hep B as adults fully recover within 1 to 3 months. Children under the age of 5 are at the highest risk of developing chronic hep B infection.

Medications can help manage chronic hep B, but about 15 to 25 percent of people die prematurely from liver cancer, cirrhosis, or liver failure.

More than half of liver cancers are caused by chronic hep B infection. Taking your medications as prescribed and following your healthcare professionals recommendations can help you minimize your chances of complications.

Is There A Cure For Chronic Hepatitis B

Currently, there is no complete cure for hepatitis B. But when managed properly, those living with the virus can expect to live a normal life. Maintaining a healthy diet and avoiding alcoholic beverages and tobacco products are crucial components in managing the disease.

You should also visit a doctor familiar with hepatitis B at least annuallythough twice a year might be best to monitor your liver through blood tests and medical imaging. As with most diseases, detecting it early leads to a better outcome. If youre exposed to the virus, you should get an antibody injection within 12 hours of exposure.

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How Do You Get Hepatitis A

Hepatitis A is found in an infected persons stool .

Hepatitis A is spread through:

  • Eating or drinking contaminated food or water
  • You can get hepatitis A by eating food prepared by a person with the virus who didnt wash his or her hands after using the bathroom and then touched the food.
  • You can get hepatitis A by eating raw or undercooked shellfish that came from sewage-contaminated water.
  • Touching unclean diaper changing areas or toilets. If an infant or toddler had hepatitis A and soiled the changing area, others who come into contact with the stool could become infected.
  • You are more likely to get hepatitis A if you travel out of the country to a developing country with poor sanitation or without access to clean water and have not gotten vaccinated for hepatitis A. Ask your doctor if you need a hepatitis A vaccination.

    Hepatitis B Vs Hepatitis C

    Hepatitis B Treatment

    Hepatitis has many different types. HBV and the hepatitis C virus have both acute and chronic forms.

    The main difference between HBV and HCV is how they spread from person to person. Although HCV is transmissible via sexual activity, this is rare. HCV usually spreads when blood that carries the virus comes into contact with blood that does not.

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    Eating Diet And Nutrition For Hepatitis B

    If you have hepatitis B, you should eat a balanced, healthy diet. Obesity can increase the chance of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease , and NAFLD can increase liver damage in people who have hepatitis B. Talk with your doctor about healthy eating and maintaining a healthy weight.

    You should also avoid alcohol because it can cause more liver damage.

    Does Hepatitis B Shorten Your Life

    Among women, chronic HBV infection increases the relative risk of mortality to 1.16 , as compared to noncarriers, which is consistent with the findings of previous research. This results in a decrease in life expectancy from 82.0 years in noncarriers to 80.1 years in carriers (Figure

    Whats the difference between acute and chronic hepatitis B?

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    How Is Autoimmune Hepatitis Treated

    Treatment works best when autoimmune hepatitis is found early. The goal of treatment is to control the disease and to reduce or get rid of any symptoms .

    To do this, medicines are used to help slow down or suppress your overactive immune system. They also stop your body from attacking your liver.

    Once you have started treatment, it can take 6 months to a few years for the disease to go into remission. Some people can stop taking medicine, but often the disease comes back. You may need treatment now and then for the rest of your life. Some people need to remain on treatment if they have relapsed many times or if their disease is severe.

    In some cases autoimmune hepatitis may go away without taking any medicines. But for most people, autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic disease.

    It can lead to scarring of the liver . The liver can become so badly damaged that it no longer works. This is called liver failure.

    If you have liver failure, a liver transplant may be needed.

    Be sure to ask your healthcare provider about recommended vaccines. These include vaccines for viruses that can cause liver disease.

    How Long Does It Last

    Hepatitis B symptoms, treatment and prevention

    According to the World Health Organization , the complete vaccine series induces protective antibody levels in of the infants, children, and adolescents who receive it.

    Immune memory induced by the HBV vaccine can last for in healthy people. That said, studies into the duration of the protection that the vaccine offers are ongoing.

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    Can Hepatitis B Go Away Completely

    Hepatitis B is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis B virus . The hepatitis B virus was the first hepatitis virus to be identified. It is a disease that affects 300 million people in the world and is estimated to be responsible for between 250,000 and 500,000 deaths per year. The prevalence of infection with the hepatitis B virus varies greatly in different parts of the world. The highest rates of infection are found in Southeast Asia, China, and southern Africa.

    Most people who acquire the hepatitis B virus recover without consequences. This form of infection, which lasts less than 6 months, is known as acute hepatitis B. On the contrary, when the infection lasts for more than 6 months, it is known as chronic hepatitis B. Approximately 5% of adults who acquire the infection develop the chronic form. The likelihood of developing chronic hepatitis B depends on the age and immune status of the patient, being higher when acquired in childhood than when acquired as an adult.

    In the last time a series of new alternatives for the treatment of the disease have been developed. On the other hand, there is a highly effective and safe vaccine to prevent infection.

    Treatments For Hepatitis B

    Hepatitis B usually clears up on its own without treatment. You may be offered medicine to help with the symptoms, such as painkillers or medicines to stop you feeling sick.

    Your GP will refer you to see a liver specialist who will check how well your liver is working.

    If hepatitis B lasts for over 6 months it is called long-term hepatitis B.

    It is usually treated with antivirals and medicine to help relieve symptoms such as itchiness, pain, and sickness. You will also need to see a liver specialist for regular check-ups.

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    What Are The Risk Factors For Getting Hepatitis B

    Due to the way that hepatitis B spreads, people most at risk for getting infected include:

    • Children whose mothers have been infected with hepatitis B.
    • Children who have been adopted from countries with high rates of hepatitis B infection.
    • People who have unprotected sex and/or have been diagnosed with a sexually transmitted infection.
    • People who live with or work in an institutional setting, such as prisons or group homes.
    • Healthcare providers and first responders.
    • People who share needles or syringes.
    • People who live in close quarters with a person with chronic hepatitis B infection.
    • People who are on dialysis.

    Living With Hepatitis B

    The ABC

    Risk of chronic infection caused by hepatitis B is related to your age, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Protection . Approximately 90% of infected infants become chronically infected compared with 2%-6% of adult, reports the CDC.

    Chronic hepatitis B infection can lead to serious health issues. If you have it, you should be monitored regularly by a doctor. This means you should check in with your doctor at least once or twice a year. Some people who have chronic hepatitis B infection require medicine, but others do not. Your doctor can discuss treatment options with you.

    If you have chronic hepatitis B infection, it will likely stay in your blood and liver for a lifetime, according to The Hepatitis B Foundation. This means that you could pass the virus to others, even if you dont feel sick.

    The most important thing to remember is that hepatitis B is a chronic medical condition that can be successfully managed if you take good care of your health and your liver, reports the Hepatitis B Foundation. You should expect to live a long, full life.

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    Lifestyle And Home Remedies

    If you’ve been infected with hepatitis B, take steps to protect others from the virus.

    • Make sex safer. If you’re sexually active, tell your partner you have HBV and talk about the risk of transmitting it to him or her. Use a new latex condom every time you have sex, but remember that condoms reduce but don’t eliminate the risk.
    • Tell your sexual partner to get tested. Anyone with whom you’ve had sex needs to be tested for the virus. Your partners also need to know their HBV status so that they don’t infect others. If positive, they should be evaluated for possible treatment.
    • Don’t share personal care items. If you use IV drugs, never share needles and syringes. And don’t share razor blades or toothbrushes, which may carry traces of infected blood.

    Clearing Acute Hepatitis B

    Some studies suggest that up to 95% of adults with acute HBV infection will spontaneously clear the virus, usually within six months, with no lasting repercussions.

    Chronic hepatitis B occurs when the immune system does not clear the virus. Around one of every 20 people acutely infected with HBV will progress to this persistent stage of infection.

    Chronic hepatitis B is a slowly progressive disease in which ongoing inflammation causes the gradual scarring of the liver. This can lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma .

    However, the course of chronic HBV infection is not set. Some people may progress faster than others, while others may never develop overt symptoms.

    Statistically speaking:

    • The risk of cirrhosis in people with chronic hepatitis B is approximately 10% to 20% over 20 years, increasing to 40% after 30 years.
    • The risk of hepatocellular carcinoma increases by 2% and 3% per year in people with HBV and cirrhosis. People without cirrhosis can also get it, but the annual risk drops to around 0.02%.

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    Who Is At Risk Of Hepatitis B

    Anyone can get hepatitis B if not vaccinated. However, in the U.S., you may be at a higher risk if you:

    • Have sex partners that have hepatitis B
    • Have HIV or another STD
    • Inject drugs or share needles, syringes, or other drug-injection equipment
    • Live with someone who has hepatitis B
    • Are undergoing dialysis
    • Travel to areas that have moderate to high rates of hepatitis B
    • Work in health care or public safety and are exposed to blood or body fluids on the job
    • Are an infant born to an infected mother

    What Is The Outlook For People With Hepatitis B

    What you need to know about Hepatitis B

    The outlook for people with HBV is better now than ever before. You are certainly able to live a full life and help yourself stay healthy. You should make sure to have regular check-ups with a healthcare provider who is qualified to treat hepatitis B, possibly a liver doctor.

    Make sure you are vaccinated against hepatitis A. Check with your healthcare provider or pharmacist before taking other medications or over-the-counter products, including supplements and natural products. These could interfere with your medication or damage your liver. For instance, taking acetaminophen in large doses may harm your liver.

    Follow the usual guidelines for living a healthy life:

    • Eat nutritious foods, choosing from a variety of vegetables, fruits and healthy proteins. It is said that cruciferous vegetables are especially good at protecting the liver.
    • Exercise regularly.
    • Dont smoke and dont drink. Both tobacco and alcohol are bad for your liver.
    • Do things that help you cope with stress, like journaling, talking with others, meditating and doing yoga.
    • Avoid inhaling toxic fumes.

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    What Happens After A Hepatitis B Infection

    Some people carry the virus in their bodies and are contagious for the rest of their lives. They should not drink alcohol, and should check with their doctor before taking any medicines to make sure these won’t cause more liver damage.

    Anyone who has ever tested positive for hepatitis B cannot be a blood donor.

    What Causes Hepatitis B

    • being born to a mother with hepatitis B
    • having unprotected sex with an infected person
    • sharing drug needles or other drug materials with an infected person
    • getting an accidental stick with a needle that was used on an infected person
    • being tattooed or pierced with tools that were used on an infected person and werent properly sterilized, or cleaned in a way that destroys all viruses and other microbes
    • having contact with the blood or open sores of an infected person
    • using an infected persons razor, toothbrush, or nail clippers

    You cant get hepatitis B from

    • being coughed on or sneezed on by an infected person
    • drinking unclean water or untreated water that has not been boiled
    • eating food that is unclean or has not been properly cooked
    • hugging an infected person
    • shaking hands or holding hands with an infected person
    • sharing spoons, forks, and other eating utensils
    • sitting next to an infected person

    Mothers who have hepatitis B can safely breastfeed their babies. If a baby receives hepatitis B immune globulin and starts receiving the hepatitis B vaccine to prevent hepatitis B infection shortly after birth, hepatitis B is unlikely to spread from mother to child through breastfeeding.15

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    Is There A Cure For Hepatitis B

    The long and short answer is that there is not yet a cure for hepatitis B. Understanding why requires insight into the virus itself and the challenges cure researchers face.

    Hepatitis B is an infectious disease caused by the hepatitis B virus . While most people exposed to hepatitis B will spontaneously clear the virus soon after infection, a proportion will go on to develop a chronic infection.

    Of these, around one in four will develop severe liver complications, including cirrhosis and liver cancer, typically years after the initial infection.

    Efforts to find a cure for hepatitis B have been underway since the virus was first identified by scientists at the National Institutes of Health in 1966. It soon became clear, however, that numerous hurdles would need to be overcome before an actual cure could be achieved. Chief among these are:

    Can Hepatitis B Be Prevented Or Avoided

    How Does Hepatitis Spread From Person To Person

    The best way to prevent hepatitis B is to always have protected sex and, if you use intravenous drugs, avoid sharing needles.

    A vaccine is available to prevent hepatitis B. It is now routinely given in the first year of life to all newborn infants. It is safe and requires 3 shots over a 6-month period. This vaccine should be given to people who are at high risk for this illness, such as healthcare workers, all children, people who travel to areas where the infection is widespread, drug users, and those who have multiple sex partners.

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    What Is Hepatitis B

    Hepatitis B is an infection of your liver. Itâs caused by a virus. There is a vaccine that protects against it. For some people, hepatitis B is mild and lasts a short time. These âacuteâ cases donât always need treatment. But it can become chronic. If that happens, it can cause scarring of the organ, liver failure, and cancer, and it even can be life-threatening.

    Itâs spread when people come in contact with the blood, open sores, or body fluids of someone who has the hepatitis B virus.

    It’s serious, but if you get the disease as an adult, it shouldnât last a long time. Your body fights it off within a few months, and youâre immune for the rest of your life. That means you can’t get it again. But if you get it at birth, itâs unlikely to go away.

    âHepatitisâ means inflammation of the liver. There are other types of hepatitis. Those caused by viruses also include hepatitis A and hepatitis C.

    Hiv And Hbv Coinfection

    About 2% of people with HIV in the United States are coinfected with HBV both infections have similar routes of transmission. People with HIV are at greater risk for complications and death from HBV infection. All people with HIV are recommended to be tested for HBV, and if susceptible, are further recommended to receive the hepatitis B vaccination or, if chronically infected, evaluated for treatment to prevent liver disease and liver cancer. For more information about HIV and HBV coinfection, visit HIV.govâs pages about hepatitis B and HIV coinfection.

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