Thursday, September 22, 2022

What Is Hepatitis C Mean

How Can I Make A Difference For People With Hepatitis C

What is Hepatitis C? | How is Hepatitis C Transmitted?

Anyone can help raise awareness about this widespread disease. Citizens can write letters to their state representatives or local newspapers and get involved in volunteer efforts with liver disease or Veteran-affiliated organizations . Speaking at support groups and sharing your experience is also a good way to help others with HCV.

What If I Am Pregnant And I Have Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C can be passed from a mother to her child during pregnancy and during delivery. Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , approximately 6 of every 100 infants born to HCV-infected mothers become infected with the virus. The risk is 2-3 times greater when the mother has HIV as well.

You and your doctor should discuss and decide if you should receive treatment for hepatitis C during your pregnancy.

What Does A Negative Hcv Antibody Test Result Mean

A negative antibody test result usually means that the person has not been infected with hepatitis C .

The body needs at least two months to make antibodies. People with weakened immune systems are not always able to produce antibodies. This might happen in people with autoimmune disorders , HIV-positive people with a CD4 cell count below < 200 cells/mm3, and people taking immunosuppressants.

Read Also: Genotype 2a Hepatitis C Virus

Are There Supplements That Are Good For My Liver

If a person eats a balanced diet, they will normally get enough vitamins and minerals. People with liver disease should avoid taking large amounts of supplements or “mega-vitamins.” This is because the liver has to do extra work to process them. Your provider may put you on a general multivitamin without iron.

Is It Safe To Take Aspirin Or Tylenol If I Have Hepatitis C

How is hepatitis C transmitted?

Tylenol is an over-the-counter pain killer. It can be harmful in high doses. If you have hepatitis or liver disease, then you can take Tylenol, but no more than 2,000 mg total over 24 hours. In general, this could be one 500 mg tablet every 6 hours, at the most. Acetaminophen is also included as an ingredient in some opiate medications and in some over-the-counter cold/flu medications, so please be aware of the dose of acetaminophen you may be taking from some combination medicines.

Aspirin, ibuprofen , naproxen , and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs , can be harmful if you have cirrhosis. They are safe in hepatitis patients who do not have cirrhosis. But, if a patient has cirrhosis, then NSAIDs cannot be taken at all. If you are not sure, always check with your provider.

Read Also: Hepatitis Is An Inflammation Of The Liver

Reactive Or Positive Hepatitis C Antibody Test

  • A reactive or positive antibody test means that Hepatitis C antibodies were found in the blood and a person has been infected with the Hepatitis C virus at some point in time.
  • Once people have been infected, they will always have antibodies in their blood. This is true even if they have cleared the Hepatitis C virus.
  • A reactive antibody test does not necessarily mean that you have Hepatitis C. A person will need an additional, follow-up test.

Persons for Whom HCV Testing Is Recommended

  • Adults born from 1945 through 1965 should be tested once
  • Those who:
  • Ever injected drugs, including those who injected once or a few times many years ago
  • Have certain medical conditions, including persons:
  • who received clotting factor concentrates produced before 1987
  • who were ever on long-term hemodialysis
  • with persistently abnormal alanine aminotransferase levels
  • who have HIV infection
  • Were prior recipients of transfusions or organ transplants, including persons who:
  • were notified that they received blood from a donor who later tested positive for HCV infection
  • received a transfusion of blood, blood components, or an organ transplant before July 1992
  • HCV- testing based on a recognized exposure is recommended for:
  • Healthcare, emergency medical, and public safety workers after needle sticks, sharps, or mucosal exposures to HCV-positive blood
  • Children born to HCV-positive women
  • Will The Baby Be Infected If The Mother Or Father Has Hepatitis C

    The baby’s risk of becoming infected with hepatitis C in the womb varies, depending on whether the parent with hepatitis C is the father or the mother.

    If the mother is infected, whether or not the father is infected, there is a 5% chance that the baby will be born with hepatitis C. The risk is the same regardless of whether the birth occurs by vaginal delivery or by cesarean section. The risk is higher if the mother is also living with HIV.

    If the father has hepatitis C but the mother does not, the baby cannot become infected because a father cannot pass the virus directly to a baby. If the father first passes the virus to the mother through sex, then the baby possibly could be infected by the mother. However, the chance of the virus being transmitted both from father to mother and then from mother to baby is almost zero.

    All children born to HCV-infected women should be tested for HCV infection. Testing is recommended using an antibody-based test at or after 18 months of age. Approximately 25-50 % infants with hepatitis C will clear the infection without any medical help by age 4. For those who become chronically infected, most have no symptoms .

    You May Like: Should I Get Hepatitis B Vaccine

    Other Things To Know:

    • After a successful course of treatment for hepatitis C, the hepatitis C antibody remains detectable, but the hepatitis C RNA will be undetectable.
    • If you plan to donate blood, you will be tested for the hepatitis C antibody and will be turned away even if you do not have an active infection.
    • Any patient with a positive test result for the hepatitis C antibody should have additional tests to determine whether or not the virus is still active.

    If You Have Hepatitis C Can You Have Sex Without Infecting Your Partner

    What is Hepatitis B and C? – Dr. Robert S. Brown

    Hepatitis C is a virus that is transmitted by blood. The most common ways people become infected with hepatitis C are through needle sharing, such as during injection drug use, or from blood transfusions received before 1992.

    Becoming infected from sex is not common, but it does happen. If you have hepatitis C, the chance of infecting a sex partner is higher if you are with a new partner or if you have had many different partners over time. If you have hepatitis C, the chance of infecting a sex partner is lower if you are with a longtime stable partner and if you are in a monogamous relationship.

    If your sex partner is new to you, or if you have many different partners, it is safer if you use condoms during sex to reduce the chance of transmitting hepatitis C.

    It is always best to talk directly with your health care provider to assess whether you should start using condoms. If you are in a sexual relationship and either you or your partner has hepatitis C, the other partner should be tested for hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted viruses once a year, or as advised by your provider.

    Read Also: Do I Have Hepatitis C

    What Causes Hepatitis C

    The hepatitis C virus causes hepatitis C. The hepatitis C virus spreads through contact with an infected persons blood. Contact can occur by

    • sharing drug needles or other drug materials with an infected person
    • getting an accidental stick with a needle that was used on an infected person
    • being tattooed or pierced with tools or inks that were not kept sterilefree from all viruses and other microorganismsand were used on an infected person before they were used on you
    • having contact with the blood or open sores of an infected person
    • using an infected persons razor, toothbrush, or nail clippers
    • being born to a mother with hepatitis C
    • having unprotected sex with an infected person

    You cant get hepatitis C from

    • being coughed or sneezed on by an infected person
    • drinking water or eating food
    • hugging an infected person
    • shaking hands or holding hands with an infected person
    • sharing spoons, forks, and other eating utensils
    • sitting next to an infected person

    A baby cant get hepatitis C from breast milk.18

    How Long Does It Last

    Hepatitis A can last from a few weeks to several months.

    Hepatitis B can range from a mild illness, lasting a few weeks, to a serious, life-long condition. More than 90% of unimmunized infants who get infected develop a chronic infection, but 6%10% of older children and adults who get infected develop chronic hepatitis B.

    Hepatitis C can range from a mild illness, lasting a few weeks, to a serious, life-long infection. Most people who get infected with the hepatitis C virus develop chronic hepatitis C.

    You May Like: Does Hepatitis Have A Cure

    Symptoms Of Hepatitis C

    It is very important to know that not everyone with hepatitis C has symptoms. The only way to know if you have hepatitis is by talking to your doctor and getting a blood test.

    Many people living with hepatitis C feel well and only have symptoms once the disease has progressed and there is serious liver damage.

    If you do not have symptoms this does not mean that the virus isnt causing damage.

    When first infected, some people may find:

    • their urine becomes dark
    • their eyes and skin turn yellow
    • they experience a minor flu-like illness.

    These symptoms may disappear within a few weeks, but this does not necessarily mean that the infection has been cleared.

    Over time, symptoms that may develop include:

    • tiredness and fatigue
    • flu-like symptoms
    • pain in the abdomen where the liver is located
    • not feeling hungry and indigestion.

    Around 30% of people who have been infected may clear the virus from their blood naturally, with no treatment, within 6 months. These people no longer have the hepatitis C virus and are not infectious, but will always have hepatitis C antibodies in their blood. The presence of hepatitis C antibodies shows that someone has been exposed to the virus, but does not offer any immunity against hepatitis C. People can become reinfected after clearing the virus naturally, or after treatment.

    Who Should Be Tested

    Hepatitis C antibody test: Results and what to expect

    Testing for hepatitis A is not routinely recommended.

    CDC recommends hepatitis B testing for:

    • Men who have sex with men
    • People who inject drugs
    • Household and sexual contacts of people with hepatitis B
    • People requiring immunosuppressive therapy
    • People with end-stage renal disease
    • People with hepatitis C
    • People with elevated ALT levels
    • Pregnant women
    • Infants born to HBV-infected mothers

    CDC recommends hepatitis C testing for:

    • All adults aged 18 years and older
    • All pregnant women during each pregnancy
    • About 24,900 new infections each year
    • About 22,600 new infections in 2018
    • Estimated 862,000 people living with hepatitis B
    • About 50,300 new infections in 2018
    • Estimated 2.4 million people living with hepatitis C

    Read Also: Treatment For Liver Cirrhosis Hepatitis B

    Can You Prevent Hepatitis C Infection

    Thereâs no vaccine to prevent hepatitis C. To avoid getting the virus:

    • Use a latex condom every time you have sex.
    • Don’t share personal items like razors.
    • Don’t share needles, syringes, or other equipment when injecting drugs.
    • Be careful if you get a tattoo, body piercing, or manicure. The equipment may have someone else’s blood on it.

    Find out more on how to prevent hepatitis C.

    What Are The Types Of Hepatitis C Infection

    There are two types of hepatitis C infection:

    • Acute: a short-term infection that occurs within 6 months after a person is exposed to the virus. However, about 75 to 85 percent of people with the acute form go on to develop the chronic form.
    • Chronic: a long-term illness that can continue throughout a persons life. It can lead to cirrhosis of the liver and other serious problems, such as liver failure or cancer. About 15,000 people a year die from liver disease associated with hepatitis C.

    Recommended Reading: Is There Any Cure For Hepatitis C

    What If You Dont Achieve Svr

    Not everyone reaches SVR. Severe side effects may cause you to stop treatment early. But some people simply dont respond, and its not always clear why. Your doctor may recommend that you try a different combination of drugs.

    Even if you dont get to SVR, these treatments may help slow the virus and be beneficial for your liver.

    If you arent going to try a different antiviral drug for whatever reason, you wont necessarily need more viral load testing. But you still have an infection that needs attention.

    This means regular blood count and liver function tests. By working closely with your doctor, you can quickly address any problems that arise.

    If youve tried several therapies without success, you might want to consider applying for a clinical trial. These trials sometimes allow you to try new drugs that are still in the testing stage. Clinical trials tend to have strict criteria, but your doctor should be able to provide more information.

    Even if you dont have many symptoms right now, hepatitis C is a chronic illness. So its important to take care of your overall health, paying particular attention to your liver. Make your health your top priority.

    You should:

    How Genotypes Affect Treatment

    What is Hepatitis C and Why Should You Care?

    Medications known as direct acting antivirals, or DAAs, stop the hep C virus from making copies of itself. Some DAAs appear to work well on all hepatitis C genotypes. Others work on only one or some.

    Your doctor will probably prescribe some combination of these medications:

    • Velpatasvir

    Some pills combine two drugs into one pill.

    You’ll probably take these meds for anywhere from 8 to 12 weeks. But they may not be right for everyone because of things like cost or other illnesses.

    Your specific genotype can tell your doctor important things about how to use those medications, what to watch for, and other drugs you might need.

    For example, you may have a higher chance for cirrhosis if you have genotype 1.

    Genotype 3, the second most common subtype worldwide, may not respond as well to DAAs alone. In addition, this type might suggest that:

    • Liver cancer is more likely.
    • Insulin resistance might happen. When your body resists or doesn’t respond to insulin as well as normal, you have a higher chance of heart disease and diabetes.
    • You might need longer, more challenging treatment

    Your doctor might adjust or change your DAA treatment if you have:

    Show Sources

    American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases: âInitial Treatment of Adults with HCV Infection,â âHCV Guidance: Recommendations for Testing, Managing, and Treating Hepatitis C.â

    CDC: âHepatitis C Questions and Answers for the Public.â

    Infohep.org: âHepatitis C treatment factsheet: Harvoni .â

    Don’t Miss: What Is A Hepatitis Panel

    Possible Complications Of Hepatitis C

    Theres one main complication of acute hepatitis C: It could become chronic.

    If you go on to develop chronic hepatitis C, you could eventually experience a number of health complications, including:

    • Cirrhosis. With cirrhosis, scar tissue gradually replaces healthy tissue in your liver, blocking blood flow and disrupting liver function. Cirrhosis can eventually lead to liver failure.
    • Liver cancer. Having chronic hepatitis C raises your risk for eventually developing liver cancer. If you develop cirrhosis or your liver is very damaged before treatment, youll still have a higher risk for cancer after getting treated.
    • Liver failure. It takes a long time for your liver to fail. Liver failure, or end-stage liver disease, happens slowly over months, often years. When your liver becomes unable to function properly, youll need a transplant.

    If you believe you contracted the hepatitis C virus, a good next step involves reaching out to a healthcare professional. Getting timely treatment can lower your risk for experiencing serious complications.

    The sooner you get a diagnosis, the sooner your healthcare professional can start a treatment plan.

    research continues.

    Currently, the best way to protect yourself from the hepatitis C virus is to avoid using any items that may have come into contact with someone elses blood.

    You can do this by:

    What Are The Side Effects Of Drug Treatment

    Common side effects for some treatments for hepatitis C may include the following:

    • nausea
    • fatigue
    • depression

    Side effects are usually worst during the first few weeks of treatment. They become less severe over time. If you are having trouble dealing with the side effects of your medicine, talk to your doctor. He or she can suggest ways to relieve some of the side effects. For example, if your medicine makes you feel nauseated, it may help to take it right before you go to sleep.

    You May Like: Hepatitis A What Is It

    Is Hep C An Std

    The most common way to get a hepatits B infection in America is through sexual contact. Compared with HIV, its 50-100 more likely that youll pass on this virus if your partner has had sex without wearing protection and/or hasnt vaccinated himself against themself during std testsThe riskier behaviors associated with transmission include having multiple partners or being male homosexual sadistic practitioner .

    How Is Hepatitis C Diagnosed And Who Should Be Tested

    Hepatitis C antibody test: Results and what to expect

    Hepatitis C infection is diagnosed with a blood test that looks for the hepatitis C virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends hepatitis C testing for:

    • All adults over the age of 18 years, at least once in their lifetime

    • People who are pregnant, once with each pregnancy

    • Children born to a person with hepatitis C infection

    • Anyone with HIV or on hemodialysis, with repeat testing as indicated

    • Anyone with an accidental needlestick or potential exposure to hepatitis C virus

    • Anyone who requests testing

    Also Check: Hepatitis B Viral Load Quantitative

    Popular Articles
    Related news