Monday, June 27, 2022

How Long Can You Live With Hepatitis

Why Is It So Important To Take Hepatitis C Drugs Correctly

Living with hepatitis B: My Story

Taking any medicine correctly is extremely important. Taking medicines correctly means:

  • not skipping doses
  • taking the medicine as instructed, such as with or without food
  • not running out of the medicine before you have picked up your refill
  • not stopping the treatment earlier than planned
  • For hepatitis C drugs, these issues are especially important because, if a medicine is not taken correctly, it may not kill the virus completely. Then, because the virus has “seen” the drug, it learns how to mutate and change in ways that allow it to escape the drug and avoid getting killed off. This is called drug resistance.

    Developing drug resistance is a serious issue. It means that the treatment may not work and that the patient may not respond to future treatments.

    To prevent drug resistance, it is important to take any medication correctly, but especially DAAs such as Harvoni, Mavyret, Epclusa, and Zepatier.

    Resistance can develop quickly. It is very important to take these new antiviral medications according to instructions, on schedule, and not to skip or reduce doses.

    If You Notice Symptoms See A Doctor Right Away

    Symptoms of hepatitis C include the following:

    • Jaundice a yellowish tone to the eyes and skin
    • Mild, chronic right belly pain
    • Nausea
    • Loss of appetite
    • Fatigue

    If you believe you have been exposed to hepatitis C or notice any symptoms, visit your primary care doctor as soon as possible. If you test positive for the virus, your doctor can refer you to a hepatologist to discuss your options.

    “I strongly encourage all baby boomers and others who are at high risk to get tested, even if you don’t look or feel sick,” Reau says. “If you do have hepatitis C, the earlier we discover it, the more likely we can prevent it from progressing and causing more serious damage.”

    What Are The Side Effects Of Treatment

    The direct acting antiviral regimens used to treat hepatitis C today are extremely well tolerated. You may experience mild side effects like headache or fatigue. For details on the side effects, review the handout specific to medication you take.

    In rare instances, providers may recommend the addition of the medication ribavirin for more difficult cases of hepatitis C. Ribavirin may cause additional side effects such as fatigue, shortness of breath, cough, anemia, or rash. Patients who receive ribavirin may need more frequent monitoring for side effects as well as adjustment of the dose if side effects are experienced. For detailed information on ribavirin, patients should review the ribavirin handout.

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    How Can I Make A Difference For People With Hepatitis C

    Anyone can help raise awareness about this widespread disease. Citizens can write letters to their state representatives or local newspapers and get involved in volunteer efforts with liver disease or Veteran-affiliated organizations . Speaking at support groups and sharing your experience is also a good way to help others with HCV.

    Related Conditions And Causes Of Hepatitis C

    How long can you live with hepatitis C?

    Other types of viral hepatitis include hepatitis A, B, D, and E.

    Hepatitis A and E are generally acquired from contaminated food and drink, while hepatitis B and D are transmitted via bodily fluids. You can only get hepatitis D if you already have hepatitis B.

    Though viruses are the most common causes of hepatitis, there are also forms of nonviral hepatitis, including:

    • Alcoholic hepatitis caused by prolonged alcohol abuse, per the Mayo Clinic
    • Autoimmune hepatitis, in which the immune system attacks healthy liver cells, per the NIDDK

    One of the most common reasons for liver transplantation in the United States is organ failure due to hep C. This network serves as a comprehensive resource for those exploring liver transplant options, organ donation, and medical advances. Profiles of people who have had transplants and connections to support groups are available.

    Also Check: Hepatitis E Causes And Treatment

    Treatment And Medication Options For Hepatitis C

    The last few years have seen extraordinary advances in the treatment of hepatitis C.

    For decades, the standard treatment was a combination antiviral therapy consisting of a pegylated interferon and ribavirin, sometimes called PEG-riba therapy. This involved weekly injections of the pegylated interferons along with twice-daily oral doses of ribavirin. Sometimes interferon was prescribed without ribavirin.

    The treatment by interferon lasted six months to a year, and cured only 40 to 50 percent of hepatitis C patients. The painful injections often made patients feel ill with flu-like symptoms.

    But now, hepatitis C can be treated with a number of direct-acting antiviral pills that act faster and much more effectively than the older interferon treatment. These combination oral medicines have 90 to 100 percent cure rates, and they work in weeks instead of months. Some of these drugs may be used in combination with ribavirin.

    Awareness Prevention And Early Diagnosis Are Essential

    There’s a good reason why hepatitis C is known as a “silent killer.”

    According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, an estimated 3.2 million Americans live with chronic hepatitis C infection, which is transmitted through infected bodily fluids like blood and semen, and causes inflammation of the liver. Yet up to 75% of people who have hepatitis C aren’t aware they have it.

    Most of those living with the virus experience only mild symptoms or don’t have any symptoms at all until they develop serious liver damage or another life-threatening liver disease. Unfortunately, that means they aren’t getting diagnosed and treatment is delayed until the later stages when irreversible liver damage has occurred.

    Here, hepatologistNancy Reau, MD, associate director of the Solid Organ Transplant Program at Rush University Medical Center, explains who is at risk for hepatitis C and offers advice to help you protect yourself.

    Also Check: Hepatitis C Viral Load Labcorp

    How Is Alcoholic Hepatitis Treated

    When alcoholic hepatitis is diagnosed, it is important that the patient stop drinking alcohol immediately. Once this happens, the condition may begin to correct itself. The livers health may improve after 6 to 12 months without alcohol in the system. The best results are seen if the patient gives up alcohol completely.

    Most patients who have been diagnosed with alcoholic hepatitis also suffer from malnutrition . The doctor and/or a dietitian will recommend a special diet and may also suggest that the patient take vitamin supplements while recovering from the disease.

    In many cases, the patient does not have an appetite and finds it difficult to get the proper nutrition. The doctor may recommend nutrition through a feeding tube or medicine that will stimulate the patients appetite.

    If the alcoholic hepatitis is severe and the patient is very sick in the hospital, medications may be prescribed to treat it. In some cases, a clinical trial medication or treatment may be considered.

    Favorite Hep C Alternative Medicine Resource

    Hepatitis C Can Be Cured

    Although hep C can be successfully treated with modern medicine, many people turn to dietary supplements with the goal of curing their illness. The most commonly used is silymarin . Although the NCCIH says that no supplement is effective for hep C, the center provides the latest scientific data on a range of products, including probiotics, zinc, licorice root, and colloidal silver.

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    What Foods Should I Avoid

    Everyone should avoid eating a lot of fat, cholesterol, salt and processed sugar, even if their liver is healthy. In addition, those with HCV should limit or avoid alcohol. Drinking alcohol will speed up liver damage.

    Eating properly can help decrease some of the symptoms of Hepatitis C, like feeling tired and sick. Drink lots of water for general health benefits. HCV is not a digestive disease diet will not affect the disease. Your provider may put you on a special diet if you have advanced liver disease.

    What Should You Know About Pregnancy And Hepatitis B

    A pregnant woman who has hepatitis B can pass the infection to her baby at delivery. This is true for both vaginal and cesarean deliveries.

    You should ask your healthcare provider to test you for hepatitis B when you find out you are pregnant. However, while it is important for you and your healthcare provider to know if you do have hepatitis B, the condition should not affect the way that your pregnancy progresses.

    If you do test positive, your provider may suggest that you contact another healthcare provider, a liver doctor, who is skilled in managing people with hepatitis B infections. You may have a high viral load and may need treatment during the last 3 months of your pregnancy. A viral load is the term for how much of the infection you have inside of you.

    You can prevent your infant from getting hepatitis B infection by making sure that your baby gets the hepatitis B vaccine in the hours after they are born along with the hepatitis B immunoglobulin. These two shots are given in two different locations on the baby. They are the first shots needed.

    Depending on the type of vaccine used, two or three more doses must be given, usually when the baby is 1 month old and then 6 months old, with the last by the time the baby is 1 year old. It is critical that all newborns get the hepatitis B vaccination, but even more important if you have hepatitis B yourself.

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    Who Are Hepatitis B Carriers

    Hepatitis B carriers are people who have the hepatitis B virus in their blood, even though they dont feel sick. Between 6% and 10% of those people whove been infected with the virus will become carriers and can infect others without knowing it. There are over 250 million people in the world who are carriers of HBV, with about 10% to 15% of the total located in India. Children are at the highest risk of becoming carriers. About 9 in 10 babies infected at birth become HBV carriers, and about half of children who are infected between birth and age 5 carry the virus. A blood test can tell you if you are a hepatitis B carrier.

    Questions To Ask Your Doctor

    Top Health Doctors
    • Do I need treatment?
    • What treatment is best for me?
    • Will I need be hospitalized?
    • Are there any medicines I should avoid taking?
    • Are there foods I should avoid eating?
    • Can I drink alcohol?
    • How can I protect my family from getting hepatitis A?
    • If Ive had hepatitis A, am I at higher risk of getting other types of hepatitis?
    • Will I have permanent liver damage?
    • How soon before I travel should I be vaccinated?

    Read Also: Signs Symptoms Of Hepatitis C

    Baby Boomers Are Especially Vulnerable

    “The hepatitis C virus didn’t have a name or a screening test until in 1989,” Reau says. “That means people born between 1945 and 1965, the group referred to as ‘baby boomers,’ are at highest risk of infection. They grew up before health care facilities started taking standard precautions, like not sharing vials of medicine among patients and requiring staff to wear gloves.”

    The CDC reports that baby boomers are five times more likely to have Hepatitis C than other adults, accounting for 75% of those living with the disease.

    These are some other reasons you may be at risk:

    • You have engaged in high-risk behaviors like IV drug use or unprotected sex
    • Your biological mother has/had hepatitis C
    • You received blood transfusions, an organ transplant or dialysis before 1989
    • You were or are currently incarcerated

    Spread Of Hepatitis C

    Hepatitis C is spread through blood-to-blood contact when blood from a person with hepatitis C enters another persons bloodstream.

    The most common way people become infected with hepatitis C in Australia is by sharing injecting equipment such as needles, syringes, spoons and tourniquets. It is possible to be infected with hepatitis C after only one risk event.

    Hepatitis C may also be spread through:

    • tattooing and body piercing with equipment that has not been properly cleaned, disinfected or sterilised such as backyard tattoos’. Registered parlours with appropriate infection control procedures are not a risk
    • needlestick injuries in a healthcare setting
    • receiving blood transfusions in Australia prior to 1990 before hepatitis C virus testing of blood donations was introduced
    • medical procedures, blood transfusions or blood products and mass immunisation programs provided in a country other than Australia
    • pregnancy or childbirth there is a 5% chance of a mother with chronic hepatitis C infection passing on the virus to her baby during pregnancy or childbirth.

    Breastfeeding is safe, however if nipples are cracked or bleeding cease breastfeeding until they have healed.

    Less likely possible routes of transmission of hepatitis C include:

    Hepatitis C cannot be transmitted by:

    • kissing
    • sharing food, cups or cutlery
    • shaking hands or day-to-day physical contact.

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    Causes Of Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Many years of heavy drinking causes inflammation of the liver. This is also called alcoholic hepatitis.

    Note that “hepatitis” is a term used to describe any inflammation of the liver. Hepatitis can have both viral and non-viral causes.

    You do not need to drink every day to develop alcoholic hepatitis. A few days a week of heavy drinking over many years can also cause liver disease. You are at risk whether or not your drinking makes you feel drunk.

    Inflammation of the liver can lead to scarring. Extensive scarring is called cirrhosis. Cirrhosis is the final phase of alcoholic liver disease.

    How long you have to live after your diagnosis depends on your health and how far the disease has progressed. Of all the things you can do to increase your lifespan, the most important may be to quit drinking.

    Only some heavy drinkers will develop alcoholic liver disease. Your rate of risk depends on:

    • The amount you drink
    • How many years you’ve been drinking
    • The history of alcoholic liver disease in your family

    If You Have Hepatitis C Can You Have Sex Without Infecting Your Partner

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    Hepatitis C is a virus that is transmitted by blood. The most common ways people become infected with hepatitis C are through needle sharing, such as during injection drug use, or from blood transfusions received before 1992.

    Becoming infected from sex is not common, but it does happen. If you have hepatitis C, the chance of infecting a sex partner is higher if you are with a new partner or if you have had many different partners over time. If you have hepatitis C, the chance of infecting a sex partner is lower if you are with a longtime stable partner and if you are in a monogamous relationship.

    If your sex partner is new to you, or if you have many different partners, it is safer if you use condoms during sex to reduce the chance of transmitting hepatitis C.

    It is always best to talk directly with your health care provider to assess whether you should start using condoms. If you are in a sexual relationship and either you or your partner has hepatitis C, the other partner should be tested for hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted viruses once a year, or as advised by your provider.

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    Tips For Safe Sex With Hepatitis

  • Be as safe as possible. Refrain from engaging in risky sexual activities, take precautions against transmission, and get tested regularly for other forms of hepatitis and sexually transmitted diseases . Consider sharing your hepatitis diagnosis with your partner or partners, and find out more about their sexual history.
  • Know how STDs are spread. Direct contact of blood, semen, or vaginal fluids with an open sore anywhere in the vagina, anus, or mouth makes passage of infection more likely. But there does not have to be a visible sore for the virus to be passed to your sexual partner, as even a minor break in the skin or mucous membranes of the genital area can allow the virus to enter.
  • Use condoms. Use a latex condom for any type of sex, and use a water-based lubricant to help reduce the chance of the condom breaking. A lubricant also decreases the chance of developing a friction-related sore on the penis or inside the vagina. The condom should be worn from the beginning until the end of sexual activity, and care should be taken when handling and disposing of the condom afterward.
  • Don’t mix sex and alcohol. Mixing alcohol or other drugs with sexual activity can impair your judgment, reduce your ability to communicate responsibly before sex, and interfere with proper condom use.
  • When its time, find a private place where you can talk to your partner without interruption.

    When To Seek Medical Advice

    See your GP if you persistently have any of the later symptoms above, or if they keep returning. They may recommend having a blood test that can check for hepatitis C. Read more about diagnosing hepatitis C.

    None of the symptoms above mean you definitely have hepatitis C, but it’s important to get them checked out.

    You should also speak to your GP about getting tested if there’s a risk you’re infected, even if you don’t have any symptoms. This particularly includes people who inject drugs or have done so in the past.

    Read about the causes of hepatitis C for more information about who’s at risk of having the infection.

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    What Causes Autoimmune Hepatitis

    Experts dont know what causes autoimmune hepatitis, but it is more likely to show up in people with other autoimmune conditions, including:

    • Thyroiditis
    • Fluid buildup in the belly
    • Confusion
    • Rectal bleeding or vomiting blood

    The symptoms of autoimmune hepatitis may look like other health problems. Always see your healthcare provider for a diagnosis.

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