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Where Does Hepatitis C Come From

Where Did Hepatitis B Come From

Are hepatitis C infections on the rise?

August 15, 2018 By Caitlin Hartwyk

Hepatitis A may be causing outbreaks in the United States, but hepatitis B is still endemic to most regions of the world. The vaccine for the disease is even suggested before traveling to any foreign destination.

As a disease thats found all around the world, many scientists have wondered where hepatitis B came from.

In 2018, that source is still a topic for debit in the world of science.

In 2013, hepatitis B was thought to have originated in birds. Then in 2015, fish were thought to be a source. Throughout all these studies, it was clear that the virus is a prehistoric disease that was around at least 82 million years ago.

Today, scientists have finally mapped out the virus and its dissemination pattern, starting from that date 82 million years ago. The study determined that strands of hepatitis B started in North Africa and the Middle East. The virus then spread to the rest of the world.

According to the WHO, approximately 257 million people in the world are currently living with the hepatitis B infection. Each year, approximately 620,000 people die from the disease. The risk for hepatitis B remains the highest in Africa and the Western Pacific.

Hepatitis B transmits through bodily fluids. The most frequent reason for its spread is infected blood or semen.

Each bit of information about hepatitis B and its history provides a better idea of where it originated.

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Living Safely With The Virus

Once you learn you have hep C, your doctor should talk to you about ways to keep your household safe. The most important is not to share razors, toothbrushes, nail clippers, or other personal care items that might come in contact with your blood. Bolter says asking family members not to use these items might be a good way to start the conversation about hep C.

Even if you donât tell them you have the virus, keep the children you live with safe. Make sure they know never to use your personal care items.

And donât reuse them yourself after treatment.

âWhen youâre cured, throw away all your old grooming products, because you could become infected again,â Bolter says. âThe same goes for manicures and pedicures. Make sure the technician doesnât cut your skin and sterilizes all the instruments in front of you. Better yet, bring your own.â

He says one thing to keep in mind when you talk to your family is that hep C doesnât make you a different person.

âYouâre the same person now they just know one more thing about you.â

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Is There A Way To Prevent Hepatitis C

Although currently theres no vaccine to protect people from contracting hepatitis C, there are vaccines for other hepatitis viruses, including hepatitis A and hepatitis B.

If you receive a hepatitis C diagnosis, your healthcare provider may advise you to get vaccinated against hepatitis A and B.

The vaccinations are recommended because these hepatitis viruses can lead to additional health and liver complications, especially in those with preexisting liver disease.

Since you cant prevent hepatitis C through a vaccine, the best prevention is to avoid exposure. Hepatitis C is a bloodborne pathogen, so you can limit your chances of exposure through these healthy lifestyle practices:

  • Avoid sharing needles, razor blades, or nail clippers.
  • Use proper safety precautions if youll be exposed to bodily fluids, such as when performing first aid.
  • Hepatitis C isnt usually transmitted through sexual contact, but its possible. Limit your exposure by practicing sex with a condom or other barrier method. Its also important to openly communicate with sexual partners and to get tested if you suspect youve been exposed to the hepatitis C virus.

Because hepatitis C is transmitted through blood, its possible to contract it through a blood transfusion.

However, since the early 1990s, blood product screening tests have been standard protocol for minimizing the risk of this type of transmission.

Subsequent testing is based on risk. Talk to your doctor about your needs.

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Questions For Your Doctor

When you visit the doctor, you may want to ask questions to get the information you need to manage your hepatitis C. If you can, have a family member or friend take notes. You might ask:

  • What kinds of tests will I need?
  • Are there any medications that might help?
  • What are the side effects of the medications you might prescribe?
  • How do I know when I should call the doctor?
  • How much exercise can I get, and is it all right to have sex?
  • Which drugs should I avoid?
  • What can I do to prevent the disease from getting worse?
  • How can I avoid spreading hepatitis C to others?
  • Are my family members at risk for hepatitis C?
  • Should I be vaccinated against other types of hepatitis?
  • How will you keep tabs on the condition of my liver?
  • Staying Healthy With Hepatitis

    Resources for Hepatitis Awareness Month and Hepatitis ...

    Not everyone needs treatment right away, but its important to be monitored regularly by an experienced doctor and discuss treatment options of the best way to keep you healthy.

    • Get vaccinated against Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B
    • Avoid alcohol and drugs
    • Eat a healthy & balanced diet. Include a lot of vegetables and fruits try to stay away from too much salt, sugar and fat.
    • Exercise regularly. Walking is one of the best exercises, and it helps to make you feel less tired.
    • Check with a health professional before taking any prescription pills, supplements, or over-the-counter medications.
    • Do not share razors, nail clippers, needles or other items that come in contact with blood with other people.

    Also Check: Hepatitis B Titer Lab Test

    Living With Hepatitis C

    Coping with hepatitis C isnt easy. You may feel sad, scared, or angry. You may not believe you have the disease. These feelings are normal, but they shouldnt keep you from living your daily life. If they do or if they last a long time you may be suffering from depression. People who are depressed have most or all of the following symptoms nearly every day, all day, for 2 weeks or longer:

    • Feeling sad, hopeless and having frequent crying spells.
    • Losing interest or pleasure in things you used to enjoy .
    • Feeling guilty, helpless, or worthless.
    • Thinking about death or suicide.
    • Sleeping too much or having problems sleeping.
    • Loss of appetite and unintended weight loss or gain.
    • Feeling very tired all the time.
    • Having trouble paying attention and making decisions.
    • Having aches and pains that dont get better with treatment.
    • Feeling restless, irritated, and easily annoyed.

    Talk to your doctor if you notice any of these symptoms. Your doctor can help by recommending a support group or a therapist. He or she may also prescribe a medicine for you to take.

    What Are The Signs & Symptoms Of Hcv Infection

    Hepatitis C can be a “silent but deadly” infection. Most people with HCV have no symptoms. But even without symptoms, they can develop health problems decades later and can still pass the disease to others.

    When symptoms do happen , they can be similar to those of hepatitis A and hepatitis B and include:

    • jaundice
    • fever
    • nausea, vomiting, and lack of appetite
    • belly pain
    • joint pain

    Also Check: How To Check For Hepatitis C

    Hepatitis C Symptoms & Treatment

    FAST FACTS:

    • Hepatitis C is found in infected blood. It is also rarely found in semen and vaginal fluids.

    • Hepatitis C is mainly passed on through using contaminated needles and syringes or sharing other items with infected blood on them. It can also be passed on through unprotected sex, especially when blood is present.

    • You can prevent hepatitis C by never sharing needles and syringes, practising safer sex, and avoiding unlicensed tattoo parlours and acupuncturists.

    • Hepatitis C will often not have any noticeable symptoms, but a simple blood test carried out by a healthcare professional will show whether you have hepatitis C.

    • In the early stages, some peoples bodies can clear a hepatitis C infection on their own, others may develop chronic hepatitis C and will need to take antiviral treatment to cure the infection.

    • Without treatment, chronic hepatitis C can lead to permanent liver damage.

    Hepatitis C is part of a group of hepatitis viruses that attack the liver.

    Its mainly passed on through contaminated needles, either from injecting drugs or from needle stick injuries in healthcare settings. It can also be transmitted sexually, especially during anal sex or other types of sex that may involve blood.

    Some groups are more at risk of getting hepatitis C than others, including people who use drugs, people in prisons, men who have sex with men, health workers and people living with HIV.

    What Drugs Treat And Cure Hepatitis C

    Hepatitis C is Curable | Johns Hopkins Viral Hepatitis Center

      The treatment of chronic hepatitis C has gone through several generations of medications. Not long ago, treatment was limited to interferon alpha-2b or pegylated interferon alpha-2b , and ribavirin . Interferon and pegylated interferon need to be injected under the skin , while ribavirin is taken by mouth. This combination therapy is infrequently used today, being recommended for only the least common genotypes of hepatitis C virus .

      Since 2010, direct-acting antiviral drugs have been in use. The second generation of antivirals for HCV was the protease inhibitors telaprevir and boceprevir , both taken by mouth. These were used in combination with the earlier drugs to increase effectiveness . These drugs are also no longer in common use, and have been replaced by better options.

      As more has been learned about how hepatitis C virus multiplies within the liver cells, new drugs continue to be developed to interfere with this multiplication at different stages. As such, we no longer think in terms of generations of drugs, but rather categories of action. Research and development of these direct-acting antivirals continue, with new agents coming to market every few months. Each category is improved and expanded by the addition of new drugs, which are safer and more effective.

      Currently available and commonly used direct-acting antiviral drugs include:

      • simeprevir
      • Muscle aches

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      What Are Most Common Adverse Reactions With Epclusa

      • The most common side effects of Epclusa in adults and children 6 years and older include headache and tiredness.
      • When used with ribavirin in advanced liver disease in adults, common side effects also include anemia , upset stomach , trouble sleeping, and diarrhea.
      • In children less than 6 years old, vomiting and spitting up the drug are the most common side effects.

      This is not all of the side effects that can occur with Epclusa, including serious side effects. Review the full listing of side effects here and discuss them with your doctor.

      How Do You Test For Hepatitis C

      A simple blood test carried out by a healthcare professional will show whether you have the virus. You may also be given an extra test to see if your liver is damaged.

      If youve got hepatitis C you should be tested for other STIs. It’s important that you tell your recent sexual partner/s so they can also get tested and treated. Many people who have hepatitis C do not notice anything wrong, and by telling them you can help to stop the virus being passed on. It can also stop you from getting the infection again.

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      Can Hepatitis C Be Prevented Or Avoided

      The only way to prevent hepatitis C is to avoid coming in contact with an infected persons blood. Always have protected sex . Dont do intravenous drugs. Dont share personal care items with a person who has hepatitis C. If youre a health care worker, follow your workplaces standard safety practices.

      Sometimes The Infection Goes Away On Its Own

      Help for Dehydration with Hep C

      Acute hepatitis is C is a short-term illness that occurs within the first six months after being exposed to the virus. Like the human papillomavirus , early acute hepatitis C can clear on its own without treatment this happens about 25% of the time.

      However, it’s more likely that the virus will remain in your body longer than six months, at which point it’s considered to be chronic hepatitis C infection.

      “Being younger or a woman tends to be a factor in whether the virus clears on its own, and genetics may play a role,” Reau says. “But we can’t determine with certainty which people are certain to clear the infection and which aren’t.”

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      What Other Tests Diagnose Hepatitis C

      Once the diagnosis of hepatitis C is established, other tests may be done to determine whether the patient has developed liver fibrosis or scarring . This can be done with a needle biopsy of the liver, and examining the biopsied liver tissue under the microscope. Liver biopsy is less commonly done today because noninvasive tests are more readily available, more easily accomplished and less costly.

      Liver imaging can evaluate fibrosis using ultrasound and MRI scans. Additionally, calculations using a variety of blood tests also can predict the degree of inflammation and fibrosis present. Genotype testing will typically be done to determine what subtype of hepatitis C the patient has, as this will impact what drugs are used for treatment.

      Testing for other infections including HIV, hepatitis A, and hepatitis B is typically done to determine if the patient might have other conditions that could impact patient’s treatment and prognosis.

      With the newest forms of antiviral treatment, the most common types of chronic hepatitis C can be cured in most individuals.

      What Laboratory Tests Diagnose Hepatitis C

      Laboratory blood tests will be done to evaluate the patient’s liver function and to look for hepatitis C antibodies . If these tests indicate that the person has hepatitis C, a hepatitis C “viral load” test will be done. This looks for genetic material from the hepatitis C virus and measures the quantity of hepatitis C virus that is circulating in the patient’s blood. This is helpful in determining if treatment is appropriate and to monitor the success of the treatment .

      Individuals who had hepatitis C in the past and cleared the virus on their own will have a positive HCV antibody test, but there will be no hepatitis C virus genetic material in the blood. If a person is immunosuppressed due to an immunological condition, cancer chemotherapy, immunotherapy or HIV/AIDS, the test results may be different and need to be evaluated accordingly.

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      How Will I Know If My Treatment Works

      The goal of treatment is to reduce the amount of the hepatitis C virus in your blood to levels that cant be detected after 24 weeks of therapy. The amount of the virus in your blood is called your viral load. At the end of your treatment, your doctor will need to measure your viral load and find out how healthy your liver is. He or she may repeat many of the same tests that were done when you were first diagnosed with hepatitis C.

      If your blood has so few copies of the virus that tests cant measure them, the virus is said to be undetectable. If it stays undetectable for at least 6 months after your treatment is finished, you have what is called a sustained virologic response . People who have an SVR have a good chance of avoiding serious liver problems in the future.

      Treatment may not reduce your viral load. You may not have an SVR after treatment. If thats true, your doctor will discuss other treatment options with you. For example, if 1 round of treatment did not decrease your viral load enough, your doctor may recommend a second round. Even if treatment doesnt keep you from having active liver disease, lowering your viral load and controlling chronic liver inflammation may help you feel better for a longer time.

      If You Notice Symptoms See A Doctor Right Away

      There is a cure for hepatitis C

      Symptoms of hepatitis C include the following:

      • Jaundice a yellowish tone to the eyes and skin
      • Mild, chronic right belly pain
      • Nausea
      • Loss of appetite
      • Fatigue

      If you believe you have been exposed to hepatitis C or notice any symptoms, visit your primary care doctor as soon as possible. If you test positive for the virus, your doctor can refer you to a hepatologist to discuss your options.

      “I strongly encourage all baby boomers and others who are at high risk to get tested, even if you don’t look or feel sick,” Reau says. “If you do have hepatitis C, the earlier we discover it, the more likely we can prevent it from progressing and causing more serious damage.”

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      What Are The Symptoms Of Hepatitis C

      During the acute phase most persons have no symptoms or might experience a mild illness. Symptoms of acute HCV infection, when present, may include:

      • Jaundice
      • Dark-colored urine, light-colored stools
      • Diarrhea
      • Fever

      During the chronic phase hepatitis C usually progresses silently, with no symptoms at all during the first 10-20 years. Signs of severe liver scarring may include:

      • Ascites
      • Star-shaped vein pattern developing on the swollen belly
      • Jaundice
      • Itching
      • Easy bruising and bleeding

      Because symptoms of hepatitis C are usually absent, persons with risk for HCV infection should be tested. The blood test for hepatitis C infection is called the hepatitis C antibody test. People who have hepatitis C infection will show positive antibodies on this test. In many cases, it is necessary to confirm a positive hepatitis C antibody test with a more specific test, such as a test for HCV virus RNA.

      If you think you have hepatitis C or have risk for hepatitis C, you should contact your doctor. The Communicable Disease Control Unit may be able to help answer your questions.

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