Tuesday, May 17, 2022

Sign Symptoms Of Hepatitis B

How Is Viral Hepatitis Diagnosed

Symptoms & complications of Hepatitis B Can Hepatitis B be cured? – Dr. Ramakrishna Prasad

Diagnosis of viral hepatitis is based on symptoms and physical findings as well as blood tests for liver enzymes, viral antibodies, and viral genetic materials.

Symptoms and physical findings

Diagnosis of acute viral hepatitis often is easy, but the diagnosis of chronic hepatitis can be difficult. When a patient reports symptoms of fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain, darkening of urine, and then develops jaundice, the diagnosis of acute viral hepatitis is likely and can be confirmed by blood tests. On the other hand, patients with chronic hepatitis due to HBV and HCV often have no symptoms or only mild nonspecific symptoms such as chronic fatigue. Typically, these patients do not have jaundice until the liver damage is far advanced. Therefore, these patients can remain undiagnosed for years to decades.

Blood tests

There are three types of blood tests for evaluating patients with hepatitis: liver enzymes, antibodies to the hepatitis viruses, and viral proteins or genetic material .

Liver enzymes: Among the most sensitive and widely used blood tests for evaluating patients with hepatitis are liver enzymes, called aminotransferases. They include aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase . These enzymes normally are contained within liver cells. If the liver is injured , the liver cells spill the enzymes into the blood, raising the enzyme levels in the blood and signaling that the liver is damaged.

Examples of tests for viral antibodies are:

History And Physical Exam

To diagnose hepatitis, first your doctor will take your history to determine any risk factors you may have for infectious or noninfectious hepatitis.

During a physical examination, your doctor may press down gently on your abdomen to see if theres pain or tenderness. Your doctor may also feel to see if your liver is enlarged. If your skin or eyes are yellow, your doctor will note this during the exam.

What Is The Treatment For Viral Hepatitis

    Treatment of acute viral hepatitis and chronic viral hepatitis are different. Treatment of acute viral hepatitis involves resting, relieving symptoms, and maintaining an adequate intake of fluids. Treatment of chronic viral hepatitis involves medications to eradicate the virus and taking measures to prevent further liver damage.

    Acute hepatitis

    In patients with acute viral hepatitis, the initial treatment consists of relieving the symptoms of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain . Careful attention should be given to medications or compounds, which can have adverse effects in patients with abnormal liver function . Only those medications that are considered necessary should be administered since the impaired liver is not able to eliminate drugs normally, and drugs may accumulate in the blood and reach toxic levels. Moreover, sedatives and “tranquilizers” are avoided because they may accentuate the effects of liver failure on the brain and cause lethargy and coma. The patient must abstain from drinking alcohol since alcohol is toxic to the liver. It occasionally is necessary to provide intravenous fluids to prevent dehydration caused by vomiting. Patients with severe nausea and/or vomiting may need to be hospitalized for treatment and intravenous fluids.

    Chronic hepatitis

    Medications for chronic hepatitis C infection include:

    • oral daclatasvir

    Medications for chronic hepatitis B infection include:

    Fulminant hepatitis

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    How Do People Get The Hbv Virus

    Hepatitis B virus is found in the blood of people with HBV infection. It enters the body through blood-to-blood contact.

    Reliable blood tests for HBV were developed many years ago. Since blood donors and blood products are tested for HBV, this is no longer the typical means of infection.

    In many parts of the world, hepatitis B virus infects more than 8% of the population. HBV-infected women pass the infection to their babies during the birth process. People can also get hepatitis B by sharing needles for injection drug use, through sexual contact with an infected person, by an accidental needlestick with a contaminated needle, or from improperly sterilized medical, acupuncture, piercing, or tattooing equipment.

    Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Test

    Hepatitis B virus information

    A hepatitis B surface antigen test shows if youre contagious. A positive result means you have hepatitis B and can spread the virus. A negative result means you dont currently have hepatitis B. This test doesnt distinguish between chronic and acute infection. This test is used together with other hepatitis B tests to determine the .

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    How Does Hepatitis B Affect The Liver

    In acute symptomatic hepatitis B, the liver can become swollen and inflamed. However the infection is often silent, particularly in infants. If the infection becomes chronic, the virus can cause inflammation and cause the healthy, soft tissues of the liver to harden and scar. About a quarter of people with chronic hepatitis B develop serious liver diseases such as cirrhosis or liver cancer.

    What Are The Symptoms And Signs Of Viral Hepatitis

      The period of time between exposure to hepatitis and the onset of the illness is called the incubation period. The incubation period varies depending on the specific hepatitis virus. Hepatitis A virus has an incubation period of about 15 to 45 days Hepatitis B virus from 45 to 160 days, and Hepatitis C virus from about 2 weeks to 6 months.

      Many patients infected with HAV, HBV, and HCV have few or no symptoms of illness. For those who do develop symptoms of viral hepatitis, the most common are flu-like symptoms including:

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      Chronic Hepatitis B Complications

      Chronic hepatitis B can lead to

      • cirrhosis, a condition in which scar tissue replaces healthy liver tissue and prevents your liver from working normally. Scar tissue also partly blocks the flow of blood through the liver. As cirrhosis gets worse, the liver begins to fail.
      • liver failure, in which your liver is badly damaged and stops working. Liver failure is also called end-stage liver disease. People with liver failure may require a liver transplant.
      • liver cancer. Your doctor may suggest blood tests and an ultrasound or another type of imaging test to check for liver cancer. Finding cancer at an early stage improves the chance of curing the cancer.

      Important Questions And Needs For Future Research

      Hepatitis B and hepatitis D virus- causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
    • How does HBV establish productive infection in vivo and what is the host response early during the infection? Despite well-described information on the clinical manifestations and natural history of acute HBV infection, detailed knowledge of the virus-host interaction during this stage remains poorly defined. Advances in this area would offer a better understanding of the pathogenesis of HBV infection and its associated disease.

    • What is the immunologic basis of chronic infection and hepatocellular injury? There have been great strides in understanding the virology and immune response of HBV infection, but the molecular mechanisms whereby the host fails to clear the virus and develops chronic infection remain largely unknown. In addition, the adaptive evolution of virus under host immune pressure remains to be elucidated. Finally, the pathogenesis of various extra-hepatic manifestations associated with HBV infection is poorly understood. Further research in these areas is crucial not only in better understanding the natural history and disease progression but also in improving treatment for chronic hepatitis B.

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      Who Should Be Vaccinated

      Children

      • All children aged 1223 months
      • All children and adolescents 218 years of age who have not previously received hepatitis A vaccine

      People at increased risk for hepatitis A

      • International travelers
      • Men who have sex with men
      • People who use or inject drugs
      • People with occupational risk for exposure
      • People who anticipate close personal contact with an international adoptee
      • People experiencing homelessness

      People at increased risk for severe disease from hepatitis A infection

      • People with chronic liver disease, including hepatitis B and hepatitis C
      • People with HIV

      Other people recommended for vaccination

      • Pregnant women at risk for hepatitis A or risk for severe outcome from hepatitis A infection

      Any person who requests vaccination

      There is no vaccine available for hepatitis C.

      Treatment For Chronic Hbv Infection

      For chronic HBV infection, antiviral medications are available.

      This is not a cure for chronic HBV. However, it can stop the virus from replicating and prevent its progression into advanced liver disease.

      A person with a chronic HBV infection can develop cirrhosis or liver cancer rapidly and without warning. If a person does not have access to adequate treatment or facilities, liver cancer can be fatal within months of diagnosis.

      People with a chronic HBV infection require ongoing medical evaluation and an ultrasound of the liver

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      How Long Does It Last

      According to the World Health Organization , the complete vaccine series induces protective antibody levels in of the infants, children, and adolescents who receive it.

      Immune memory induced by the HBV vaccine can last for in healthy people. That said, studies into the duration of the protection that the vaccine offers are ongoing.

      How Can You Avoid Hepatitis B

      Symptoms of hepatitis B. Liver. World Hepatitis Day. July ...

      Getting the vaccine for hepatitis B is the best way toprevent hepatitis B. The hepatitis B vaccine is safe andeffective. It is usually given as 3-4 shots over a 6-monthperiod. You will not get hepatitis B from the vaccine.Ask your health care provider if you should get thisvaccine. It is recommended for:

      • All infants, starting with the first dose of hepatitis B vaccine at birth
      • Everyone under the age of 19 who has not been vaccinated
      • People whose sex partners have hepatitis B
      • Sexually active people who are not in a long-term, faithful relationship
      • People with a sexually transmitted disease
      • People who share needles, syringes, or other drug-injection equipment
      • People who have close household contact with someone infected with the hepatitis B virus
      • Health care and public safety workers at risk for exposure to blood or body fluids on the job
      • People with kidney disease. This includes all those on dialysis and those being considered for dialysis.
      • Adults with diabetes
        • Before anal sex
        • Before oral sex
      • Have sex with only one partner who does not have sex with others and does not have hepatitis B.
    • Know that other forms of birth control do not protect against hepatitis B.
    • Not using or injecting drugs.
    • Not reusing or sharing syringes, or drug equipment .
    • Wear gloves if you have to touch another person’s blood.
    • Do not use another person’s toothbrush, razor, nail clippers or any other item that might have even a tiny bit of blood on it.
      • Sterile tools

      For more information, see Safer Sex.

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      Prevent Hepatitis B Infections In Newborns

      If you are pregnant and have hepatitis B, talk with your doctor about lowering the risk that the infection will spread to your baby. Your doctor will check your virus levels during pregnancy. If virus levels are high, your doctor may recommend treatment during pregnancy to lower virus levels and reduce the chance that hepatitis B will spread to your baby. Your doctor may refer you to a liver specialist to find out if you need hepatitis B treatment and to check for liver damage.

      When it is time to give birth, tell the doctor and staff who deliver your baby that you have hepatitis B. A health care professional should give your baby the hepatitis B vaccine and HBIG right after birth. The vaccine and HBIG will greatly reduce the chance of your baby getting the infection.

      How Are Hepatitis B And C Treated

      • Antiviral medications, interferon injections and a liver transplant are options for treatment of ongoing infections. Not everyone will need these treatments.
      • Medicines known as direct-acting antiviral agents are now available that can lead to a cure in 8 to 12 weeks in many patients with hepatitis C, but hepatitis B may require long-term treatment.
      • There is a vaccine that is used to prevent hepatitis B infection in both adults and newborns, but there is no vaccine yet for hepatitis C.

      The newer direct-acting antiviral agents medications to treat HCV include:

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      How Is Viral Hepatitis Prevented

      Prevention of hepatitis involves measures to avoid exposure to the viruses, using immunoglobulin in the event of exposure, and vaccines. Administration of immunoglobulin is called passive protection because antibodies from patients who have had viral hepatitis are given to the patient. Vaccination is called active protection because killed viruses or non-infectious components of viruses are given to stimulate the body to produce its own antibodies.

      Avoidance of exposure to viruses

      Prevention of viral hepatitis, like any other illness, is preferable to reliance upon treatment. Taking precautions to prevent exposure to another individual’s blood , semen , and other bodily secretions and waste will help prevent the spread of all of these viruses.

      Use of immunoglobulins

      Immune serum globulin is human serum that contains antibodies to hepatitis A. ISG can be administered to prevent infection in individuals who have been exposed to hepatitis A. ISG works immediately upon administration, and the duration of protection is several months. ISG usually is given to travelers to regions of the world where there are high rates of hepatitis A infection and to close or household contacts of patients with hepatitis A infection. ISG is safe with few side effects.

        Hepatitis A

        Individuals at increased risk of acquiring hepatitis A are:

        Some local health authorities or private companies may require hepatitis A vaccination for food handlers.

        Hepatitis B

        Hepatitis B vaccine is recommended for:

        How Is Hepatitis B Spread

        What are the symptoms of Hepatitis B? – Dr. Nagaraj B. Puttaswamy

        You can become infected with hepatitis B through exposure to blood, semen and other bodily fluids of an infected person. You can get the infection by:

        • Having unprotected sex.
        • Sharing or using dirty needles for drug use, tattoos or piercing.
        • Sharing everyday items that may contain body fluids, including razors, toothbrushes, jewelry for piercings and nail clippers.
        • Being treated medically by someone who does not use sterile instruments.
        • Being bitten by someone with the infection.
        • Being born to a pregnant woman with the infection.

        Hepatitis B is not spread by:

        • Kissing on the cheek or lips.
        • Coughing or sneezing.
        • Hugging, shaking hands or holding hands.
        • Eating food that someone with the infection has prepared.
        • Breastfeeding.

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        Do You Need Vaccinations Before Traveling Abroad

        The CDC divides travel vaccinations into three categories: 1) routine, 2) recommended, and 3) required. The only vaccine classified as “required” by International Health Regulations is the yellow fever vaccination for travel to certain countries in sub-Saharan Africa and tropical South America.

        “Routine” vaccinations are those that are normally administered, usually during childhood, in the United States. These include immunizations against:

        • tetanus

        Hepatitis B In The United States

        In the United States, about 862,000 people have chronic hepatitis B.6 Asian Americans and African Americans have higher rates of chronic hepatitis B than other U.S. racial and ethnic groups.10 Researchers estimate that about half of the people living with chronic hepatitis B in the United States are Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.11 Chronic hepatitis B is also more common among people born in other countries than among those born in the United States.7

        The hepatitis B vaccine has been available since the 1980s and, in 1991, doctors began recommending that children in the United States receive the hepatitis B vaccine. The annual rate of acute hepatitis B infections went down 88.5 percent between 1982 and 2015.12 In 2017, the annual number of hepatitis B infections rose in some states.13 Experts think the rise was related to increases in injection drug use. Injection drug use increases the risk of hepatitis B infection.

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        Viral Hepatitis Definition And Overview

        Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. Many illnesses and conditions can cause inflammation of the liver, for example, drugs, alcohol, chemicals, and autoimmune diseases. Many viruses, for example, the virus causing mononucleosis and the cytomegalovirus, can inflame the liver. Most viruses, however, do not attack primarily the liver the liver is just one of several organs that the viruses affect. When most doctors speak of viral hepatitis, they are using the definition that means hepatitis caused by a few specific viruses that primarily attack the liver and are responsible for about half of all human hepatitis. There are several hepatitis viruses they have been named types A, B, C, D, E, F , and G. As our knowledge of hepatitis viruses grows, it is likely that this alphabetical list will become longer. The most common hepatitis viruses are types A, B, and C. Reference to the hepatitis viruses often occurs in an abbreviated form The focus of this article is on these viruses that cause the majority of human viral hepatitis.

        Hepatitis viruses replicate primarily in the liver cells. This can cause the liver to be unable to perform its functions. The following is a list of major functions of the liver:

        Can Hepatitis B Be Treated

        Hepatitis B Reactivation with Hepatitis C Treatment

        If you know you have been exposed to the hepatitis B virus in the previous seven days or less, you can receive an injection of hepatitis B immune globulin that may prevent you from developing the disease. Besides this, there is no treatment for acute hepatitis B.

        If you have chronic hepatitis B, two types of treatment exist interferon which is a medication administered by a needle, and antiviral medicines that are taken by mouth. Current approved hepatitis B oral medications include lamivudine, adefovir, telbivudine, tenofovir, and entecavir. These treatments do not provide a cure, but they offer control of the virus so that further damage to your liver can be prevented. When and how to treat your hepatitis B is a decision between you and your doctor. Availability of the medications listed above may vary from province to province based on provincial government drug plans and individual insurance plans.

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