Thursday, September 22, 2022

How Do You Know If Have Hepatitis C

How Is Hepatitis C Treated

What is Hepatitis C and Why Should You Care?

Treatment for hepatitis C depends on how long you have had the virus.

People with acute infection do not always need treatment because their immune system may clear hepatitis C on its own. If you test positive during the acute stage, your doctor may ask you to come back after a few months to re-test and to see if you need any treatment.

If you develop chronic infection, you will need treatment to help clear the virus. Treatment with drugs called direct-acting antivirals can cure hepatitis in most cases. These are usually taken for 8-12 weeks. Your doctor will also check your liver for any damage.

If youâve had hepatitis C in the past, youâre not immune to future infections â which means you can get it again. You can also still get other types of hepatitis and having hepatitis C together with another type is more serious.

If youâve already had hepatitis C, itâs advisable to have the vaccination against hepatitis A and B to protect your liver from further damage.

Whether you have symptoms or not, donât have sex until your healthcare professional says you can.

I Found Out I Have Hepatitis C And Have Had It For Over 40 Years

OPINION: Your results are positive. You have Hepatitis C, my doctor said.

She then told me other medical stuff on that phone call but by then Id gone straight to gobsmacked. A fairly reasonable who me? reaction had set in.

Shock, awe and the awareness that this was the disease that had taken out my rock and roll idols like David Bowie and Lou Reed.

At least 37 years ago in a vast chemical diet I had been at times a junkie. Not devout and committed like so many of my now dead friends, but a junkie all the same.

READ MORE: * NZ scientist proves new drug to be a silver bullet for Hepatitis C so why isnt it available to other Kiwis?

There was no needle exchange scheme then. You shot what you got with what you could get. Lots of sharing, cooking dirty needles over candle flames for the fussy and lots of cross infection.

Prime infection risk for the hepatitis family A,B and C and then not too much later for HIV/AIDS.

Trouble is you dont have to have been much of an anything to get Hep C. Injecting once will do just fine, as will unsafe body piercings, snorting drugs, tattoos or sex that involves some blood. Even that safe ear piercing will do. Blood transfusions have also figured. This club is hyper promiscuous.

One of the upsides of having been a chemical pig was that I was done by 28.The doctor who helped me detox said that basically I had pushed it all so far there werent a whole lot of benchmarks to work off for how recovery would go.

Which came back positive.

What Are The Symptoms

Most people have no symptoms when they are first infected with the hepatitis C virus. If you do develop symptoms, they may include:

    • Feeling very tired.
    • Sore muscles.
    • Dark urine.
    • Yellowish eyes and skin . Jaundice usually appears only after other symptoms have started to go away.

Most people go on to develop chronic hepatitis C but still don’t have symptoms. This makes it common for people to have hepatitis C for 15 years or longer before it is diagnosed.

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Treatment Of Hepatitis B

We must reiterate that if you believe either you or your loved one may be exposed to HBV, you should seek medical attention immediately.

The first thing the doctor will order is a shot of hepatitis B immune globulin . When it is given within 12 hours of exposure, the shot can give you or your loved one short-term protection from hepatitis B infection.

If you have yet to receive a hepatitis B vaccination shot, the doctor will arrange for you or your loved one to be given the vaccine.

The vaccine will give you or your loved one immunity from hepatitis B it is the main source of safeguarding a community from hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B During Pregnancy

ALL YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT HEPATITIS

If a woman with HBV becomes pregnant, they may transmit the virus to their baby. Women should inform the doctor who delivers their baby that they have HBV.

The infant should receive an HBV vaccine and HBIG with 1224 hours of birth. This significantly reduces the risk that they will develop HBV.

The HBV vaccine is safe to receive while pregnant.

People with a high risk of HBV include:

  • the infants of mothers with HBV
  • the sexual partners of people with HBV
  • people who engage in sexual intercourse without contraception and those who have multiple sexual partners
  • men who have sex with men
  • people who inject illicit drugs
  • those who share a household with a person who has a chronic HBV infection
  • healthcare and public safety workers who are at risk of occupational exposure to blood or contaminated bodily fluids
  • people receiving hemodialysis, which is a type of kidney treatment
  • people taking medications that suppress the immune system, such as chemotherapy for cancer
  • those who come from a region with a high incidence of HBV
  • all women during pregnancy

People can prevent HBV infection by:

  • wearing appropriate protective equipment when working in healthcare settings or dealing with medical emergencies
  • not sharing needles
  • following safe sexual practices
  • cleaning any blood spills or dried blood with gloved hands using a 1:10 dilution of one part household bleach to 10 parts water

A vaccine against HBV has been available since 1982.

People who should receive this vaccine include:

Also Check: Can You Get Hepatitis A After Vaccination

Treatment If The Condition Gets Worse

Severe liver damage caused by chronic hepatitis C usually takes 20 or more years to develop.

If your hepatitis C continues to get worse, it can cause your liver to stop working, a condition called end-stage liver failure. In this case, a liver transplant may be the only way to extend your life. But if you are drinking alcohol, are sharing needles to inject drugs, or have severe depression or certain other mental illnesses, liver transplant may not be an option.

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Contagious And Incubation Periods

The incubation periodthe time it takes for symptoms to appear after the hepatitis C virus has entered your bodyis from 2 weeks to 6 months. But not all people have symptoms when they are first infected.

You can spread the virus to someone else at any time after you are infected, even if you don’t have symptoms.

Also Check: How Does Someone Catch Hepatitis C

If I Have Hepatitis C Infection Does This Mean I Am Going To Have Other Health Problems

Hepatitis C can cause scarring of the liver leading to cirrhosis and liver cancer. Other conditions have also been linked to hepatitis C and are known as extra-hepatic manifestations of hepatitis C. They include diabetes mellitus, arthritis, hypothyroid, and aplastic anemia among other conditions. Talk to your provider for more information.

Living With Hepatitis C

How Do You Know if You Have Hepatitis – Symptoms of Liver Damage

Coping with hepatitis C isnt easy. You may feel sad, scared, or angry. You may not believe you have the disease. These feelings are normal, but they shouldnt keep you from living your daily life. If they do or if they last a long time you may be suffering from depression. People who are depressed have most or all of the following symptoms nearly every day, all day, for 2 weeks or longer:

  • Feeling sad, hopeless and having frequent crying spells.
  • Losing interest or pleasure in things you used to enjoy .
  • Feeling guilty, helpless, or worthless.
  • Thinking about death or suicide.
  • Sleeping too much or having problems sleeping.
  • Loss of appetite and unintended weight loss or gain.
  • Feeling very tired all the time.
  • Having trouble paying attention and making decisions.
  • Having aches and pains that dont get better with treatment.
  • Feeling restless, irritated, and easily annoyed.

Talk to your doctor if you notice any of these symptoms. Your doctor can help by recommending a support group or a therapist. He or she may also prescribe a medicine for you to take.

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How Is Hepatitis C Spread Will My Loved Ones Catch It From Me

Household transmission of hepatitis C is extremely rare. Here are some ways the virus is transmitted:

  • Injecting drugs, such as heroin, even if its only once. The needles and other drug works that are used to prepare or inject the drug may have had someone elses blood that contained HCV on them.
  • Being a health care worker with frequent contact with blood on the job, especially from accidental needlesticks.
  • Having a mother who had hepatitis C when she gave birth to you.
  • Sharing items such as razors, toothbrushes, and other personal health items that might have had blood on them.
  • Getting a tattoo with unsanitary instruments, as they might have someone elses blood on them.
  • Having unprotected sex with multiple partners. Although hepatitis C rarely is spread through sexual contact, it can happen.
  • The number one risk factor for infection and transmission is sharing needles for intravenous drug use. Most people who use IV drugs become infected with HCV within one year of sharing needles. Learn more.

    Eat Regular Nutritious Meals

    Sometimes people with hepatitis C have a hard time eating. You may have no appetite, feel nauseated, or have different tastes than you are used to. Even if you don’t feel like eating, it’s very important to eat small meals throughout the day. Some people have nausea in the afternoon. If this happens to you, try to eat a big, nutritious meal in the morning.

    If you have cirrhosis, it may not be a good idea to eat salty foods or foods that are high in protein. If you want to know more about which foods to avoid and which foods are good to eat, ask your doctor about meeting with a registered dietitian to discuss a healthy eating plan.

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    Is Banana Good For Hepatitis B

    Bananas have emerged as the best candidate to deliver a bite-sized vaccine for hepatitis B virus to millions of people in developing countries, according to an article scheduled for the June 1 issue of ACS Biotechnology Progress, a bi-monthly journal co-published with the American Institute of Chemical Engineers

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    When Should You See A Doctor Or Other Healthcare Professional

    What You Need to Know About Hepatitis C

    Since so many people dont experience any symptoms, healthcare professionals recommend getting screened for hepatitis C at least once in your adult life. They may recommend more frequent screenings if you have a higher risk of contracting the virus.

    Hepatitis C doesnt always become severe, but the chronic form can increase your risk for liver damage, liver cancer, and liver failure.

    If you have any symptoms that suggest hepatitis C, especially if theres a chance youve been exposed, connect with a doctor or another healthcare professional as soon as possible to discuss your options for testing and treatment.

    With a prompt diagnosis, you can get treatment earlier, which may help prevent damage to your liver.

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    How Is Monitoring Done After Treatment For Hepatitis C

    Once patients successfully complete treatment, the viral load after treatment determines if there is an SVR or cure. If cure is achieved , no further additional testing is recommended unless the patient has cirrhosis. Those who are not cured will need continued monitoring for progression of liver disease and its complications.

    While cure eliminates worsening of fibrosis by hepatitis C, complications may still affect those with cirrhosis. These individuals still need regular screening for liver cancer as well as monitoring for esophageal varices that may bleed.

    Because hepatitis B co-infection may reactivate or worsen even after treatment for HCV, monitoring for hepatitis symptoms may be needed after the end of therapy.

    What Causes Hepatitis C Infection

    Hepatitis C is caused by the hepatitis C virus. It is spread by contact with an infected person’s blood.

    You can get hepatitis C if:

      • You share needles and other equipment used to inject illegal drugs.
      • You had a blood transfusion or organ transplant before 1992. Since the early 1990s, all donated blood and organs are screened for hepatitis C in Canada.
      • You get a shot with a needle that has infected blood on it. This happens in some developing countries where they use needles more than once when giving shots.
      • You get a tattoo or a piercing with a needle that has infected blood on it. This can happen if equipment isn’t cleaned properly after it is used.

    In rare cases, a mother with hepatitis C may spread the virus to her baby during pregnancy or childbirth, or a health care worker may be accidentally exposed to blood that is infected with hepatitis C.

    The risk of getting hepatitis C through sexual contact is very small.footnote 1 The risk is higher if you have many sex partners or you engage in unprotected sexual activity that may involve contact with blood or an exchange of blood with an infected person . The presence of HIV or other sexually transmitted infections also increases the chances of getting hepatitis C sexually.

    You cannot get hepatitis C from casual contact such as hugging, kissing, sneezing, coughing, or sharing food or drink.

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    You Can Have It And Not Know It

    What is Hepatitis C?

    Hepatitis C is a liver disease caused by the hepatitis C virus . HCV is far more infectious than HIV. Presently, there is no vaccine to prevent HCV infection.

    In 2011, it is estimated that over 220,000 people in Canada were infected with HCV. In 2012, 10,180 new cases of hepatitis C were reported in Canada. It has been estimated that over 40% of people living with chronic hepatitis C dont even know they are infected.

    About 15 to 25 percent of adults will recover within 6 months of becoming infected . The remaining 75 to 85 percent are unable to clear the virus and will become chronically infected. Chronic hepatitis C is treatable and in some instances can be cured.

    Why is hepatitis C a health concern?

    Many people infected with HCV do not know they have the virus because symptoms can take two to six months to appear and the majority of people will not develop symptoms. During this time, they can spread the infection to others. You may not know you have this infection until damage has already been done to your liver. Potential complications from chronic hepatitis C include cirrhosis of the liver, liver failure, liver cancer and premature death.

    Why do I need my liver?

    How is hepatitis C virus spread?

    Organization:

    The most common risk factors for HCV infection include:

    What are the symptoms of hepatitis C?

    How can I find out if I have hepatitis C?

    How can I protect myself and others against HCV?

    What if I have hepatitis C?

    Remember:

    Avoid Alcohol And Drugs

    What you need to know about Hepatitis B

    One of the most important jobs of your liver is to break down drugs and alcohol. If you have hepatitis C, one of the best things you can do is to avoid substances that may harm your liver, such as alcohol and illegal drugs. If you have cirrhosis, you also may need to avoid certain medicines.

    If you use illegal drugs or drink alcohol, it is important to stop. Being honest with your doctor about your drug and alcohol use will help you deal with any substance use disorders. If you don’t feel that you can talk openly with your doctor, you may want to find a doctor you feel more comfortable with. If you want to stop using drugs or alcohol and need help to do so, ask your doctor or someone else you trust about drug and alcohol treatment options.

    Because many medicines can stress your liver, talk to your doctor before you take any prescription or over-the-counter medicines. This includes herbal remedies as well.

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    Ive Never Used Iv Drugs Or Been Stuck With A Dirty Needle How Did I Get Hepatitis C

    Hepatitis C is usually spread through direct contact with the blood of a person who has the disease. It can also be transmitted by needles used for tattooing or body piercing. In rare cases, hepatitis C can be passed from a mother to her unborn baby. This virus can be transmitted through sex and sharing razors or toothbrushes. These occurrences are also rare. Many times, the cause of hepatitis C is never found.

    Can I Drink Alcohol Once In A While If I Have Hepatitis C

    Alcohol can clearly contribute to worsening liver disease. You must discuss with your health care provider if any amount of alcohol is safe for you.

    Alcohol can cause inflammation and scarring in the liver. If you have any underlying liver condition, such as hepatitis C or hepatitis B or damage from long-term alcohol use, your liver will be more sensitive to alcohol. When you have hepatitis C virus, alcohol on top of the hepatitis C can cause the inflammation and scarring to be worse, and overall damage to the liver may happen much faster when you drink alcohol.

    Here is some helpful information about alcohol and hepatitis:

  • No one knows exactly what amount of alcohol is safe when you have hepatitis C. Some small amounts of alcohol may be safe while you have hepatitis C and have mild damage in the liver, but if you have cirrhosis, then no amount of alcohol is safe and you should not drink at all.
  • All forms of alcohol can be damaging. In other words, beer and wine are not safer than whiskey.
  • If you have severe scarring , then you should not drink any alcohol at all.
  • If you are awaiting a transplant, you also cannot drink any alcohol at all.
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