Sunday, May 22, 2022

Can A Person With Hepatitis B Get Vaccinated

Complications Of Hepatitis B In Infants And Children

Can elderly people with Hepatitis B take a vaccine? | Apollo Hospitals

Mothers who are infected with hepatitis B can pass the virus to their children either through the womb or at the time of birth. Hepatitis B virus can also be spread through exposure of broken skin or mucous membranes to the blood or other body fluids of an infected person.

If newborn babies are quickly immunised with 2 vaccines, they can be protected from getting hepatitis B.

Many people who are infected with hepatitis B have no symptoms. Babies and children who are infected with hepatitis B are less likely than adults to have symptoms of infection, but are more likely to develop chronic hepatitis B.

A child who contracts chronic hepatitis B has an increased risk of developing liver disease and cancer later in life. A small proportion of adults who become infected with the hepatitis B virus develop a long-term hepatitis B infection.

If I Already Have Hepatitis B Can The Vaccine Treat It

No. The hepatitis vaccine prevents hepatitis, but doesnt cure it if you already have it. If you have hepatitis B, there are other treatment options.

However, if you recently got exposed to the hepatitis B virus and you havent had the vaccine yet, tell your doctor right away. The vaccine and possibly other treatment can reduce your chances of getting hepatitis B if you get it within 2 weeks after you came into contact with the virus. The sooner you seek care after being exposed to hepatitis B, the better, so try to get there right away.

Immunisation Against Hepatitis B

The current Australia-wide immunisation program is necessary to protect all children from hepatitis B infection.

A full course of hepatitis B injections must be given for a child to be protected. It is recommended that this course begins within 24 hours of birth with a vaccine against hepatitis B alone. Further doses are routinely given at 2 months, 4 months and 6 months, as a combination vaccine.

Immunisation is the best protection against hepatitis B infection. In Victoria a free hepatitis B vaccine is available for a number of groups at high risk, including men who have sex with men, and people living with HIV.

The adult course involves 3 doses of the vaccine over 6 months and gives protection to about 95 per cent of people. Once you have had the 3 doses, you can have a blood test to see if you are protected.

Don’t Miss: List Of Hepatitis C Medications

Persons New To Canada

Health care providers who see persons newly arrived in Canada should review the immunization status and update immunization for these individuals, as necessary. In many countries outside of Canada, HB vaccine is in limited use.

All persons from a country that is endemic for HB should be assessed and vaccinated against HB if not immune and not infected. Individuals born in developing countries are more likely to be carriers of HB, necessitating vaccination of their sexual and household contacts based on review of their serologic test results. HB vaccine is recommended for all household contacts whose families have immigrated to Canada from areas in which there is a high prevalence of HB and who may be exposed to HB carriers through their extended families or when visiting their country of origin.

Children adopted from countries in which there is a high prevalence of HB infection should be screened for HBsAg and, if positive, household or close contacts in the adopting family should be immunized before adoption or as soon as possible thereafter. Adults going to pick-up children from these countries should be vaccinated before departure. Refer to Immunization of Persons New to Canada in Part 3 for additional information.

How To Prevent Hepatitis B

All babies should be given Hepatitis B vaccine at birth

Hepatitis B is a liver infection caused by a virus . It can be serious and theres no cure, but the good news is its easy to prevent. You can protect yourself by getting the hepatitis B vaccine and having safer sex. If you have oral, anal, and vaginal sex, use condoms and dental dams to help stop the spread of hepatitis B and other STDs.

Read Also: Hepatitis C And Liver Cancer

Babies And Children Can Develop Chronic Hbv

You may be wondering why the recommendations for the HBV vaccine start on the first day of life.

Adults who contract HBV will likely not experience long-term complications from hepatitis B. But the same is not the case for babies. As many as of babies who contract an HBV infection at birth from their mothers become chronically infected with HBV.

Children between the ages of 1 and 5 who get an HBV infection have a 25 percent of people who become chronically infected during childhood will develop liver cancer or cirrhosis. Thats why pediatricians want children to have immunity from HBV from the earliest possible age. Many babies and children exposed to HBV receive post-exposure prophylaxis, which decreases chance of infection.

If youre pregnant, youll most likely have a blood test to see if youre positive for hepatitis B. This allows doctors to find out if theres a chance that you could pass on the virus. These tests are highly sensitive and have a good accuracy rate, but they arent perfect. Additionally, a pregnant person may become infected between the time of the test and giving birth. The first dose of the vaccine given at birth lowers the risk of a newborn baby contracting hepatitis B.

How Do People Get The Hbv Virus

Hepatitis B virus is found in the blood of people with HBV infection. It enters the body through blood-to-blood contact.

Reliable blood tests for HBV were developed many years ago. Since blood donors and blood products are tested for HBV, this is no longer the typical means of infection.

In many parts of the world, hepatitis B virus infects more than 8% of the population. HBV-infected women pass the infection to their babies during the birth process. People can also get hepatitis B by sharing needles for injection drug use, through sexual contact with an infected person, by an accidental needlestick with a contaminated needle, or from improperly sterilized medical, acupuncture, piercing, or tattooing equipment.

Also Check: Where To Get Tested For Hepatitis C

Who Should Get Immunised Against Hepatitis B

Anyone who wants to protect themselves against hepatitis B can talk to their doctor about getting immunised.

Hepatitis B immunisation is recommended for:

People under 20 years old, refugees and other humanitarian entrants of any age, can get hepatitis B vaccines for free under the NIP. This is if they did not receive the vaccines in childhood. This is called catch-up vaccination.

Who Should Not Get The Hepatitis B Vaccine

Ending hepatitis B with crucial birth dose vaccine

Generally seen as a safe vaccine, there are some circumstances in which doctors advise against receiving the HBV vaccine. You shouldnt have the hepatitis B vaccine if:

  • youve had a serious allergic reaction to a previous dose of the hepatitis B vaccine
  • you have a history of hypersensitivity to yeast or to any other vaccine components
  • youre experiencing a moderate or severe acute illness

If youre currently experiencing an illness, you should postpone receiving the vaccine until your condition has improved.

You May Like: Hepatitis B Vaccine Dose For Adults

Get To Know Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a serious liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus which is a major cause of chronic liver disease worldwide, especially in Africa and Asia, including Thailand. Chronic hepatitis B is strongly associated with hepatic fibrosis and development of liver cancer. The virus is passed from person to person through blood, semen, saliva or other body fluids. Common routes of transmission that hepatitis B virus can spread are:

  • Mother to child during childbirth
  • Direct contact with blood or open wound of infected person
  • Sexual contact and
  • Sharing certain equipment that can spread the virus e.g. needles and toothbrushes. In addition, hepatitis B is a concern for health care workers and anyone else who come in contact with human blood.

Most adults with hepatitis B infection fully recover, although their signs and symptoms are severe. Infants and children are more likely to develop a chronic hepatitis B infection.

Who Should Not Get The Vaccine

Speak with your health care provider if you have had a life-threatening reaction to a previous dose of hepatitis B vaccine, or any component of the vaccine such as yeast, or to latex.

There is no need to delay getting immunized because of a cold or other mild illness. However, if you have concerns speak with your health care provider.

Don’t Miss: Can You Get Hepatitis From Your Own Blood

I Have Liver Disease Or Cirrhosis Of The Liver Will This Make Me More At Risk With Covid

If you have cirrhosis of the liver or liver disease, there is no evidence that you are at greater risk of catching COVID-19.

Having cirrhosis of the liver may increase the risk of severe illness if you have COVID-19, but the evidence is limited at the moment.

If you have elevated liver enzymes or abnormal liver function test as a result of liver disease, you may also be at risk of severe illness if you have COVID-19.

For these reasons, its best to take all necessary precautions to keep yourself safe from COVID-19 by following government and medical recommendations.

Everyone with cirrhosis should see their liver specialist regularly. Call and speak to your specialist about what is best for your health.

Why Get Vaccinated Against Hepatitis B

Vaccines

Hepatitis B vaccine can prevent hepatitis B. Hepatitis B is a liver disease that can cause mild illness lasting a few weeks, or it can lead to a serious, lifelong illness.

Acute hepatitis B virus infection is a short-term illness that can lead to fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, jaundice , and pain in the muscles, joints, and stomach.

Chronic hepatitis B virus infection is a long-term illness that occurs when the hepatitis B virus remains in a person’s body. Most people who go on to develop chronic hepatitis B do not have symptoms, but it is still very serious and can lead to liver damage , liver cancer, and death. Chronically infected people can spread hepatitis B virus to others, even if they do not feel or look sick themselves.

Hepatitis B is spread when blood, semen, or other body fluid infected with the hepatitis B virus enters the body of a person who is not infected. People can become infected with the virus through:

  • Birth
  • Sharing items such as razors or toothbrushes with an infected person
  • Contact with the blood or open sores of an infected person
  • Sex with an infected partner
  • Sharing needles, syringes, or other drug-injection equipment
  • Exposure to blood from needlesticks or other sharp instruments

Most people who are vaccinated with hepatitis B vaccine are immune for life..

Read Also: Can You Live A Normal Life With Hepatitis C

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Hepatitis B Immunisation

All medicines and vaccines can have side effects. Sometimes they are serious, most of the time theyre not.

Generally, the chance of having a serious side effect from a vaccine is much lower than the chance of serious harm if you caught the disease.

Talk to your doctor about possible side effects of hepatitis B vaccines, or if you or your child have possible side effects that worry you.

Common side effects of hepatitis B vaccines include:

  • soreness where the needle went in
  • low-grade fever
  • body aches.

The Consumer Medicine Information links in How do you get immunised against hepatitis B? list the side effects of each vaccine.

Immunisation Against Hepatitis B For Children

Immunisation is the best protection against hepatitis B infection and is recommended for all infants and young children, adolescents and those in high-risk groups. Immunisation can be with a vaccine against hepatitis B alone or with a combination vaccine.

Protection against hepatitis B is available free of charge under the National Immunisation Program Schedule.

In Victoria, immunisation against hepatitis B is free for all babies and children including:

  • Babies at birth immunisation against hepatitis B alone as soon as possible after birth.
  • Babies at 2, 4 and 6 months immunisation in the form of a diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, hepatitis B, polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine .
  • Premature babies at 12 months premature babies born under 32 weeks gestation or under 2,000g birth weight receive a single booster dose.
  • Children up to and including 9 years of age.

You May Like: Common Symptoms Of Hepatitis C

Rare Side Effects After Immunisation

There is a very small risk of a serious allergic reaction to any vaccine. This is why you are advised to stay at the clinic or medical surgery for at least 15 minutes following immunisation, in case further treatment is required.

If you think your child may be having a serious allergic reaction and you are no longer at the clinic where they were immunised, take them immediately to your doctor or to the nearest hospital, or call 000 for an ambulance.

Another rare side effect is the hypotonic-hyporesponsive episode . If they are experiencing HHE, a baby may be:

  • pale
  • limp
  • unresponsive.

This may occur from one to 48 hours following vaccination. The whole episode may last from a few minutes to 36 hours.

If you think your child may be having an HHE episode, take them immediately to your doctor or to the nearest hospital.

Follow-up of children with HHE shows no long-term neurological or other side effects.

The Hepatitis B Vaccine

Hepatitis B vaccine for Grade 7 Students

The hepatitis B vaccine sometimes known by the trade name Recombivax HB is used to prevent this infection. The vaccine is provided in three doses.

The first dose can be taken on a date you choose. The second dose must be taken one month later. The third and final dose must be taken six months after the first dose.

Adolescents 11 to 15 years old may follow a two-dose regimen.

Also Check: Hepatitis B Can Cause Liver Cancer

To Whom Is The Hepatitis B Vaccine Administered

A free vaccine is offered as part of the national programme to

  • haemophiliacs receiving regular treatment
  • persons close to intravenous drug users, including family members, housemates and sexual partners
  • men who have sex with men

In case of persons belonging to one of these groups, also check their protection against hepatitis A. If the person has not received either vaccine previously, you can administer a free hepatitis A and B combination vaccine.

Due to increased infection risk, a free hepatitis B vaccine is also offered to

  • newborn children and sexual partners of, and those living in the same household with, persons with a hepatitis B infection and asymptomatic HBsAg positive persons
  • sex workers
  • students exposed to infection risk during internships
  • persons at risk of hepatitis B infection resulting from a needlestick injury or other blood exposure and who have been exposed in environments other than the workplace
  • children aged under 5 years at a day care centre when a child in the group is known to be HBsAg positive
  • newborn infants when at least one of the parents comes from a country where hepatitis B is common
  • newborn infants of mothers with a hepatitis C infection.

Do I Need To Pay For Hepatitis B Immunisation

Vaccines covered by the NIP are free for people who are eligible. See the NIP Schedule to find out which vaccines you or your family are eligible to receive.

Eligible people get the vaccine for free, but your health care provider may charge a consultation fee for the visit. You can check this when you make your appointment.

If you are not eligible for free vaccine, you may need to pay for it. The cost depends on the type of vaccine, the formula and where you buy it from. Your immunisation provider can give you more information.

Also Check: Can You Cure Hepatitis A

Ive Had A Liver Transplant Should I Still Get The Covid Vaccine

YES. People who have had a liver transplant and are on anti-rejection drugs can and should still get the COVID vaccination. The vaccine is both safe and effective. People who have had a liver transplant are particularly vulnerable to severe illness if they get COVID-19 and so are encouraged the get the COVID vaccine when offered.

Managing Fever After Immunisation

Are you at High Risk for Hepatitis A? Get vaccinated ...

Common side effects following immunisation are usually mild and temporary . Specific treatment is not usually required.

There are a number of treatment options that can reduce the side effects of the vaccine such as giving extra fluids to drink and not overdressing if there is a fever.

Although routine use of paracetamol after vaccination is not recommended, if fever is present, paracetamol can be given check the label for the correct dose or speak with your pharmacist, especially when giving paracetamol to children.

Also Check: How Do You Cure Hepatitis A

Persons With Chronic Diseases

Refer to Immunization of Persons with Chronic Diseases in Part 3 for additional general information about vaccination of people with chronic diseases.

Chronic renal disease and patients on dialysis

People with chronic renal disease may respond sub-optimally to HB vaccine and experience more rapid decline of anti-HBs titres, and are therefore recommended immunization with a higher vaccine dose. Individuals undergoing chronic dialysis are also at increased risk for HB infection. In people with chronic renal disease anti-HBs titre should be evaluated annually and booster doses using a higher vaccine dose should be given as necessary.

Neurologic disorders

People with conditions such as autism spectrum disorders or demyelinating disorders should receive all routinely recommended immunizations, including HB-containing vaccine.

Chronic liver disease

HB immunization is recommended for non-immune persons with chronic liver disease, including those infected with hepatitis C, because they are at risk of more severe disease if infection occurs. Vaccination should be completed early in the course of the disease, as the immune response to vaccine is suboptimal in advanced liver disease. Post-immunization serologic testing may be used to confirm vaccine response.

Non-malignant hematologic disorders

Persons with bleeding disorders and other people receiving repeated infusions of blood or blood products are considered to be at higher risk of contracting HB and should be offered HB vaccine.

Popular Articles
Related news