Tuesday, May 17, 2022

How Bad Is Hepatitis B

How Can I Prevent Spreading Hepatitis B To Others

Hepatitis B Can Cause Liver Damage, Cancer

If you have hepatitis B, follow the steps above to avoid spreading the infection. Your sex partners should get a hepatitis B test and, if they arent infected, get the hepatitis B vaccine. You can protect others from getting infected by telling your doctor, dentist, and other health care professionals that you have hepatitis B. Dont donate blood or blood products, semen, organs, or tissue.

What Are The Signs & Symptoms Of Hbv Infection

HBV can cause a wide range of symptoms, from a mild illness and general feeling of being unwell to more serious chronic liver disease that can lead to liver cancer.

Someone with hepatitis B may have symptoms similar to those caused by other viral infections, like the flu. The person might:

  • be extra tired
  • feel like throwing up or actually throw up
  • not feel like eating
  • have a mild fever

HBV also can cause darker than usual pee, jaundice , and belly pain.

People exposed to hepatitis B may start to have symptoms from 1 to 6 months later. Symptoms can last for weeks to months.

In some people, hepatitis B causes few or no symptoms. But even someone who doesn’t have any symptoms can still spread the disease to others.

What Should You Know About Pregnancy And Hepatitis B

A pregnant woman who has hepatitis B can pass the infection to her baby at delivery. This is true for both vaginal and cesarean deliveries.

You should ask your healthcare provider to test you for hepatitis B when you find out you are pregnant. However, while it is important for you and your healthcare provider to know if you do have hepatitis B, the condition should not affect the way that your pregnancy progresses.

If you do test positive, your provider may suggest that you contact another healthcare provider, a liver doctor, who is skilled in managing people with hepatitis B infections. You may have a high viral load and may need treatment during the last 3 months of your pregnancy. A viral load is the term for how much of the infection you have inside of you.

You can prevent your infant from getting hepatitis B infection by making sure that your baby gets the hepatitis B vaccine in the hours after they are born along with the hepatitis B immunoglobulin. These two shots are given in two different locations on the baby. They are the first shots needed.

Depending on the type of vaccine used, two or three more doses must be given, usually when the baby is 1 month old and then 6 months old, with the last by the time the baby is 1 year old. It is critical that all newborns get the hepatitis B vaccination, but even more important if you have hepatitis B yourself.

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Hepatitis A: Who Is At Risk

A prime risk factor for hepatitis A is traveling to or living in a country with high infection rates. You can check the CDC’s travel advisories to learn about recent outbreaks. Eating raw foods or drinking tap water can raise your risk while traveling. Children who attend daycare centers also have a higher risk of getting hepatitis A.

Living With Hepatitis B

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Risk of chronic infection caused by hepatitis B is related to your age, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Protection . Approximately 90% of infected infants become chronically infected compared with 2%-6% of adult, reports the CDC.

Chronic hepatitis B infection can lead to serious health issues. If you have it, you should be monitored regularly by a doctor. This means you should check in with your doctor at least once or twice a year. Some people who have chronic hepatitis B infection require medicine, but others do not. Your doctor can discuss treatment options with you.

If you have chronic hepatitis B infection, it will likely stay in your blood and liver for a lifetime, according to The Hepatitis B Foundation. This means that you could pass the virus to others, even if you dont feel sick.

The most important thing to remember is that hepatitis B is a chronic medical condition that can be successfully managed if you take good care of your health and your liver, reports the Hepatitis B Foundation. You should expect to live a long, full life.

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What Causes Hepatitis B

The hepatitis B virus causes hepatitis B. The hepatitis B virus spreads through contact with an infected persons blood, semen, or other body fluids. Contact can occur by

  • being born to a mother with hepatitis B
  • having unprotected sex with an infected person
  • sharing drug needles or other drug materials with an infected person
  • getting an accidental stick with a needle that was used on an infected person
  • being tattooed or pierced with tools that were used on an infected person and werent properly sterilized, or cleaned in a way that destroys all viruses and other microbes
  • having contact with the blood or open sores of an infected person
  • using an infected persons razor, toothbrush, or nail clippers

You cant get hepatitis B from

  • being coughed on or sneezed on by an infected person
  • drinking unclean water or untreated water that has not been boiled
  • eating food that is unclean or has not been properly cooked
  • hugging an infected person
  • shaking hands or holding hands with an infected person
  • sharing spoons, forks, and other eating utensils
  • sitting next to an infected person

Mothers who have hepatitis B can safely breastfeed their babies. If a baby receives hepatitis B immune globulin and starts receiving the hepatitis B vaccine to prevent hepatitis B infection shortly after birth, hepatitis B is unlikely to spread from mother to child through breastfeeding.15

Why Is Hepatitis B So Dangerous

Hepatitis B is dangerous because it is a silent infection, which means it can infect people without them knowing it. Most people who are infected with hepatitis B are unaware of their infection for many years and can unknowingly spread the virus to others through direct contact with their infected blood and sexually. Please visit this page to learn more about hepatitis B transmission and how to protect your family. For those who become chronically infected, there is an increased risk of developing serious liver disease later in life. The virus can quietly and continuously attack the liver over many years without being detected because there are often few or no notable symptoms. The only way to confirm a hepatitis B infection is through a blood test. Visit this page and learn more about testing for hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B may feature typical viral hepatitis symptoms like yellow skin, yellow eye-white sclera and dark urine. Alternatively, it may occur unnoticed with subtle fatigue and/ or muscle pain. This is why it is often missed.

Additional resources:

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How Do You Get Hepatitis A

The main way you get hepatitis A is when you eat or drink something that has the hep A virus in it. A lot of times this happens in a restaurant. If an infected worker there doesn’t wash their hands well after using the bathroom, and then touches food, they could pass the disease to you.

Food or drinks you buy at the supermarket can sometimes cause the disease, too. The ones most likely to get contaminated are:

  • Shellfish
  • Ice and water

You could catch or spread it if you’re taking care of a baby and you don’t wash your hands after changing their diaper. This can happen, for example, at a day care center.

Another way you can get hep A is when you have sex with someone who has it.

Hepatitis B: What Happens

The Truth about Hepatitis B

Many adults who get hepatitis B have mild symptoms for a short time and then get better on their own. But some people are not able to clear the virus from the body, which causes a long-term infection. Nearly 90% of infants who get the virus will carry it for life. Over time, hepatitis B can lead to serious problems, such as liver damage, liver failure, and liver cancer.

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How Is Hepatitis B Prevented

Testing & Vaccination

  • The hepatitis B vaccine offers excellent protection against HBV. The vaccine is safe and highly effective. Vaccination consists of 3 doses of vaccine over the course of 6 months. Protection lasts for 20 years to life.
  • The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that all children should receive hepatitis B vaccine starting at birth. .
  • The CDC recommends hepatitis B vaccine for persons traveling to countries where HBV is common .
  • If you have one or more risk factors for hepatitis B infection, you should get a simple HBV blood test. The blood test will determine whether you are:
  • immune to hepatitis B or
  • susceptible to hepatitis B and need vaccination or
  • infected with hepatitis B and need further evaluation by a physician
  • The basic test for acute HBV infection is called the Hepatitis B Core IgM Antibody test. People who have acute hepatitis B show positive IgM antibodies on this test.
  • Perinatal Hepatitis

    • California law requires testing of all pregnant women for hepatitis B infection
    • If the mother is HBV-infected, she will pass the infection to the baby during the birth process, unless the baby gets immunized within hours of birth
    • Giving the infant HBIG and HBV vaccine right away will reliably prevent infection of the infant
    • Other family members should best tested for hepatitis B too, and given vaccine if they are not already infected or immune

    Healthy Habits

    After Exposure to Hepatitis B

    What Are The Types Of Hepatitis

    There are many types of hepatitis which cause symptoms that range from mild to very serious.

    Five types of viral hepatitis are:

    • hepatitis A an illness that can last from a few weeks to 6 months
    • hepatitis B a serious infection that can lead to liver damage
    • hepatitis C a disease that is now easily treatable
    • hepatitis D a disease that only affects people infected with hepatitis B, and is a rarer type of hepatitis in Australia
    • hepatitis E a short-term illness that can be severe in pregnant women, but is rare in Australia

    There are other types of hepatitis that are not infectious, including:

    • autoimmune hepatitis

    Having one type of hepatitis doesnt stop you from getting other types.

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    Key Facts About Hepatitis B

    • Hepatitis B is a viral infection that attacks the liver and can cause both acute and chronic liver disease, including cancer.
    • The virus is transmitted through contact with the blood or other body fluids of an infected person.
    • About 2 billion people worldwide have been infected with the virus and about 370 million live with chronic infection and liver damage.
    • Two thirds of those infected with HBV are unaware of their infection
    • An estimated 800 000 people die each year due to HBV induced liver cancer or cirrhosis.
    • Despite there being a vaccine, globally HBV kills one person every minute
    • About 25% of adults who become chronically infected during childhood later die from liver cancer or cirrhosis caused by the chronic infection.
    • The hepatitis B virus is 50 to 100 times more infectious than HIV.
    • Hepatitis B is preventable with a safe and effective vaccine.

    Who Is Most Affected

    Hepatitis A

    In the United States, rates of new HBV infections are highest among adults aged 40-49 years, reflecting low hepatitis B vaccination coverage among adults at risk. The most common risk factor among people with new HBV infections is injecting drugs, related to the opioid crisis.

    The highest rates of chronic hepatitis B infection in the United States occur among foreign-born individuals, especially people born in Asia, the Pacific Islands, and Africa. Approximately 70% of cases in the United States are among people who were born outside of the United States. CDC developed this map of the geographic distribution of hepatitis B around the world – PDF. Other groups who have higher rates of chronic HBV infection include people who inject drugs and men who have sex with men.

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    What Are Clinical Trials For Hepatitis B

    Clinical trialsand other types of clinical studiesare part of medical research and involve people like you. When you volunteer to take part in a clinical study, you help doctors and researchers learn more about disease and improve health care for people in the future.

    Researchers are studying many aspects of hepatitis B, such as

    • progression of hepatitis B and long-term outcomes
    • new treatments for hepatitis B
    • prevention of reactivated or worsening hepatitis B in people receiving cancer treatment

    What If You Test Positive

    If a test says you have viral hepatitis, you can take steps to protect the ones you love. For hepatitis A, wash hands frequently. For hepatitis B and C, avoid sharing nail clippers, razors, or toothbrushes. Hepatitis B, and sometimes hepatitis C, can be passed through sexual contact. Make sure everyone in your household gets the hepatitis B vaccine. An important step is to see a specialist to discuss treatment options.

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    How Is Hepatitis B Spread

    You can become infected with hepatitis B through exposure to blood, semen and other bodily fluids of an infected person. You can get the infection by:

    • Having unprotected sex.
    • Sharing or using dirty needles for drug use, tattoos or piercing.
    • Sharing everyday items that may contain body fluids, including razors, toothbrushes, jewelry for piercings and nail clippers.
    • Being treated medically by someone who does not use sterile instruments.
    • Being bitten by someone with the infection.
    • Being born to a pregnant woman with the infection.

    Hepatitis B is not spread by:

    • Kissing on the cheek or lips.
    • Coughing or sneezing.
    • Hugging, shaking hands or holding hands.
    • Eating food that someone with the infection has prepared.
    • Breastfeeding.

    Diagnosis Of Hepatitis B

    Myths and Facts about Hepatitis B

    Blood tests are available to determine if you are or have been infected with hepatitis B. It may take 6 months from the time of infection before a blood test can detect antibodies to hepatitis B, so follow-up testing may be required. During this 6-month period, until you know whether you are infected or not, take action to prevent potential infection of other people.

    There are also tests that can assess liver damage from hepatitis B. The interpretation of these tests can be complicated and specialist advice is needed, so talk to your doctor.

    All pregnant women are tested for hepatitis B. If you are found to have chronic hepatitis B, your doctor can help reduce the risk of transferring the infection to your newborn child.

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    Treatment: Chronic Hepatitis C

    The latest drug to be approved by the FDA is glecaprevir and pibrentasvir . This medication offers a shorter treatment cycle of 8 weeks for adult patients with all types of HCV who donât have cirrhosis and who have not been previously treated. The length of treatment is longer for those who are in a different disease stage. The prescribed dosage for this medicine is 3 tablets daily.

    There are several other combination drugs available, as well as some single drugs that may be used in combination. Your doctor will choose the right one for you depending on the type of hepatitis C you have, how well your liver is functioning and any other medical problems you may have. Also be sure to discuss your insurance coverage since these medications are expensive.

    If I Have Hepatitis How Can I Avoid Giving It To Someone Else

    For hepatitis A, one of the best things you can do is wash your hands a lot. That will keep the virus out of food and drinks.

    If you have hepatitis B and C, you need to find ways to keep others from making contact with your blood. Follow these tips:

    • Cover your cuts or blisters.
    • Carefully throw away used bandages, tissues, tampons, and sanitary napkins.
    • Don’t share your razor, nail clippers, or toothbrush.
    • If your blood gets on objects, clean them with household bleach and water.
    • Don’t breastfeed if your nipples are cracked or bleeding.
    • Don’t donate blood, organs, or sperm.
    • If you inject drugs, don’t share needles or other equipment.

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    Hepatitis C: Who Is At Risk

    People who have injected illegal drugs at any time, even one time, many years ago, could be walking around with chronic hepatitis C. Because there are often no symptoms, many former drug users may not realize they have the infection. People who received a blood transfusion before 1992 also have a higher risk. Before that year, donated blood was not screened for the hepatitis C virus.

    What Is Portal Hypertension

    Hepatitis B vs. hepatitis C: Differences and which is worse

    A healthy liver is soft, like a sponge. It gets most of its blood supply from a large blood vessel called the portal vein.

    When the liver is soft, blood can flow into it easily, like water from a hose pouring into a sponge. Imagine that sponge gets hard like a rock. Water from the hose cannot flow in as easily and pressure builds up in the hose. Just like the hose, pressure in the portal vein can build up when the liver becomes hard, and blood cannot flow into it very well. This condition is called portal hypertension.

    To relieve pressure in the portal vein, the blood takes detours around the liver in other veins. Some of these veins are in the esophagus, the tube that carries food from your mouth to your stomach. Other veins are in the stomach itself. Some of these new blood vessels, called varices, which can form in the stomach and esophagus, become large and may rupture due to the high blood pressure and thin vessel walls, causing bleeding in the upper stomach or esophagus.

    Portal hypertension can also make your spleen bigger. One of the jobs of the spleen is to control the number of platelets you have in your body. Platelets help your blood to clot. When the spleen gets bigger and cannot do its job properly, you may notice you bruise more easily, or it takes longer to stop bleeding if you hurt yourself. Portal hypertension is important, because it can lead to major complications of cirrhosis, such as ascites and varices.

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