Thursday, June 16, 2022

What Is Hepatitis A B C

How Do You Get Hepatitis B

What is Hepatitis B and C? – Dr. Robert S. Brown

The virus that causes hepatitis B lives in blood, semen, and other fluids in your body. You usually get it by having sex with someone who’s infected.

You also can get it if you:

  • Have direct contact with infected blood or the body fluids of someone who’s got the disease, for instance by using the same razor or toothbrush as someone who has hepatitis B, or touching the open sores of somebody who’s infected.
  • If you’re pregnant and you’ve got hepatitis B, you could give the disease to your unborn child. If you deliver a baby who’s got it, they need to get treatment in the first 12 hours after birth.

What Is The Follow

Follow the recommendations of the health care professional.

  • Take it easy get plenty of rest.
  • Drink plenty of clear fluids.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages.
  • Avoid medicines such as acetaminophen that can be harmful to the liver.
  • Avoid prolonged or vigorous physical exercise until your symptoms improve.
  • Be extra careful about personal hygiene and close personal contacts, especially while the person is still shedding HAV, and thus is still capable of transmitting the disease.

How To Protect Yourself Against Hepatitis B

Dr. Fried emphasizes that hepatitis B infection can be prevented by avoiding risky behaviors involving sex and drugs and by getting vaccinated. The hepatitis B vaccination is required for infants at birth, and subsequent vaccinations for adults are also important. There are separate vaccines for hepatitis A and B, but there is also a combination A and B vaccine so you can take care of both types at once. In North Carolina, newborn vaccinations have been required since 1994. Anyone born before this year should talk to their health care provider about being vaccinated for hepatitis B.

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How Is Viral Hepatitis Diagnosed

Diagnosis of viral hepatitis is based on symptoms and physical findings as well as blood tests for liver enzymes, viral antibodies, and viral genetic materials.

Symptoms and physical findings

Diagnosis of acute viral hepatitis often is easy, but the diagnosis of chronic hepatitis can be difficult. When a patient reports symptoms of fatigue, nausea, abdominal pain, darkening of urine, and then develops jaundice, the diagnosis of acute viral hepatitis is likely and can be confirmed by blood tests. On the other hand, patients with chronic hepatitis due to HBV and HCV often have no symptoms or only mild nonspecific symptoms such as chronic fatigue. Typically, these patients do not have jaundice until the liver damage is far advanced. Therefore, these patients can remain undiagnosed for years to decades.

Blood tests

There are three types of blood tests for evaluating patients with hepatitis: liver enzymes, antibodies to the hepatitis viruses, and viral proteins or genetic material .

Liver enzymes: Among the most sensitive and widely used blood tests for evaluating patients with hepatitis are liver enzymes, called aminotransferases. They include aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase . These enzymes normally are contained within liver cells. If the liver is injured , the liver cells spill the enzymes into the blood, raising the enzyme levels in the blood and signaling that the liver is damaged.

Examples of tests for viral antibodies are:

What Is The Treatment For Viral Hepatitis

Know The ABC

    Treatment of acute viral hepatitis and chronic viral hepatitis are different. Treatment of acute viral hepatitis involves resting, relieving symptoms, and maintaining an adequate intake of fluids. Treatment of chronic viral hepatitis involves medications to eradicate the virus and taking measures to prevent further liver damage.

    Acute hepatitis

    In patients with acute viral hepatitis, the initial treatment consists of relieving the symptoms of nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain . Careful attention should be given to medications or compounds, which can have adverse effects in patients with abnormal liver function . Only those medications that are considered necessary should be administered since the impaired liver is not able to eliminate drugs normally, and drugs may accumulate in the blood and reach toxic levels. Moreover, sedatives and “tranquilizers” are avoided because they may accentuate the effects of liver failure on the brain and cause lethargy and coma. The patient must abstain from drinking alcohol since alcohol is toxic to the liver. It occasionally is necessary to provide intravenous fluids to prevent dehydration caused by vomiting. Patients with severe nausea and/or vomiting may need to be hospitalized for treatment and intravenous fluids.

    Chronic hepatitis

    Medications for chronic hepatitis C infection include:

    • oral daclatasvir

    Medications for chronic hepatitis B infection include:

    Fulminant hepatitis

    Read Also: Is There Immunization For Hepatitis C

    How Do You Prevent Hepatitis A

    If a person has hepatitis A, strict personal hygiene and hand washing help prevent transmission of HAV to others. There are ways to help reduce or prevent HAV infection.

    • Wash hands thoroughly every time after use of the bathroom, before touching or preparing food, and before touching others. Wash hands with soap and warm water, and then dry the hands thoroughly .
    • Contaminated surfaces should be cleaned with household bleach to kill the virus.
    • Heat food or water to 185 F or 85 C to kill the hepatitis A virus.

    If people are not infected with HAV, they can reduce the chance of becoming infected by the following methods:

    • Wash hands carefully with soap and warm water several times a day, including every time the bathroom is used, every time a diaper is changed, and before preparing food.
    • Do not eat raw or undercooked seafood or shellfish such as oysters from areas of questionable sanitation .
    • Individuals traveling to developing countries should not drink untreated water or beverages with ice in them. Fruits and vegetables should not be eaten unless cooked or peeled.

    Hepatitis A Vaccine

    In addition to the above methods, there are vaccines that work to prevent infection with HAV, but are not substitutes for good hygiene and careful food and drink consumption.

    Not everyone needs to have the hepatitis A vaccines. However, the CDC recommends the HAV vaccine for the following groups:

    Is Hepatitis Testing Recommended For People With Hiv

    Yes. Everyone living with HIV should be tested for HBV and HCV when they are first diagnosed with HIV and begin treatment. People living with HIV who have ongoing risk factors for getting hepatitis B or hepatitis C should be tested annually.

    In addition, new HCV screening recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention call for:

    • One-time screening for all adults 18 years and older
    • Screening of all pregnant women during every pregnancy
    • Testing for all persons with risk factors, with testing continued periodic testing those with ongoing risk.

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    How Is It Treated

    Hepatitis A is treated using supportive methods. These can include things like rest, fluids, and healthy foods. Medications can also help to ease some symptoms like fever, aches, and pains.

    Theres a vaccine available to protect against infection with HAV. This is typically recommended for children as well as for people at an increased risk for contracting the virus.

    Also, receiving a single dose of the hepatitis A vaccine may prevent you from becoming ill if youve been exposed to HAV. For it to be effective, the vaccine needs to be given of exposure.

    What Is Chronic Viral Hepatitis

    Hepatitis A, B, C, D, E Nursing Symptoms, Treatment, Causes, NCLEX

    Patients infected with HBV and HCV can develop chronic hepatitis. Doctors define chronic hepatitis as hepatitis that lasts longer than 6 months. In chronic hepatitis, the viruses live and multiply in the liver for years or decades. For unknown reasons, these patients’ immune systems are unable to eradicate the viruses, and the viruses cause chronic inflammation of the liver. Chronic hepatitis can lead to the development over time of extensive liver scarring , liver failure, and liver cancer. Liver failure from chronic hepatitis C infection is the most common reason for liver transplantation in the U.S. Patients with chronic viral hepatitis can transmit the infection to others with blood or body fluids as well as infrequently by transmission from mother to newborn.

    Read Also: Types Of Hepatitis B Virus

    How Are Hepatitis B And Hepatitis C Spread From Person To Person

    Like HIV, the hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses spread:

    • From mother to child: Pregnant women can pass these infections to their infants. HIV-HCV coinfection increases the risk of passing on hepatitis C to the baby.
    • Sexually: Both viruses can also be transmitted sexually, but HBV is much more likely than HCV to be transmitted sexually. Sexual transmission of HCV is most likely to happen among gay and bisexual men who are living with HIV.

    Vaccination Is The Best Way To Prevent Hepatitis A And B Infection

    Narrator: ÂYou are a traveller…Â .

    Narrator: …and you are already dreaming of your next getaway. .

    Disclaimer on-screen reads: TWINRIX is a combined hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccine used in adults, adolescents, children, and infants over the age of 1 year to prevent hepatitis A and hepatitis B diseases

    Narrator: ÂWhile your travel plans probably donÂt include hepatitis A or hepatitis B…Â .

    Disclaimer reads: 100% protection cannot be guaranteed and booster doses may be required.

    Narrator: Â…you know that many common travel activities can put you at risk of acquiring these two serious liver diseases…Â .

    Disclaimer reads: TWINRIX does not protect against hepatitis C or E, and is not indicated to treat or reduce the severity of hepatitis A or B infections. .

    Narrator: Â…which is why you plan on talking to your doctor about TWINRIX, right? … Of course, right…Â Â…because you are a traveller.Â

    Video concludes with TWINRIX logo, GSK logo, You are a traveller slogan, and safety information: Very commonly reported adverse events in adults were pain or discomfort, redness at the infection site, headache, and tiredness. Common adverse events were swelling at the injection site, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, and generally feeling unwell. Allergic reactions may also occur. Full product information can be found on Twinrix.ca. If you need to report an adverse event, please call 1-800-387-7374.

    Twinrix.ca

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    Preventing Hepatitis A B & C

    The three most common types of hepatitis, a disease characterized by inflammation of the liver, are those caused by the hepatitis A, B, and C viruses. All viral types are contagiousthat is, they can be spread from one person to anotheralthough the methods of transmission vary.

    NYU Langone doctors recommend specific preventive steps for each type to limit your risk of acquiring or spreading infection.

    Do You Need Vaccinations Before Traveling Abroad

    Hepatitis B Reactivation with Hepatitis C Treatment

    The CDC divides travel vaccinations into three categories: 1) routine, 2) recommended, and 3) required. The only vaccine classified as “required” by International Health Regulations is the yellow fever vaccination for travel to certain countries in sub-Saharan Africa and tropical South America.

    “Routine” vaccinations are those that are normally administered, usually during childhood, in the United States. These include immunizations against:

    • tetanus

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    What Do The Results Mean

    A negative result means you probably don’t have a hepatitis infection. A positive result may mean you have or previously had an infection from hepatitis A, hepatitis B, or hepatitis C. You may need more tests to confirm a diagnosis. If you have questions about your results, talk to your health care provider.

    Learn more about laboratory tests, reference ranges, and understanding results.

    Hepatitis A B And C: Whats The Difference

    Hepatitis is often caused by a virus that comes in different strains. The most common strains of hepatitis are hepatitis A, B, and C. They all are contagious, but they differ primarily by the way they are spread.

    Table: Differences among hepatitis A, B, and C

    Table: Differences among hepatitis A, B, and C

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    Diagnosing Hepatitis A B & C

    At NYU Langone, hepatologists, or liver specialists, and infectious disease specialists use blood tests to diagnose hepatitis A, B, and C. These viral infections cause inflammation of the liver.

    If the results of a blood test confirm a diagnosis of viral hepatitis, your doctor may recommend imaging tests or a liver biopsy to determine the extent of liver disease.

    Hepatitis B: What Happens

    What is Hepatitis B and C? – Dr. Eva Urtasun Sotil

    Many adults who get hepatitis B have mild symptoms for a short time and then get better on their own. But some people are not able to clear the virus from the body, which causes a long-term infection. Nearly 90% of infants who get the virus will carry it for life. Over time, hepatitis B can lead to serious problems, such as liver damage, liver failure, and liver cancer.

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    How Do I Avoid Getting Sick

    These tips will help protect you and your family from Hepatitis A:

    • Wash your hands after using the washroom and changing diapers, and before preparing or eating food.
    • When travelling, especially to developing countries:
    • drink water from a safe supply
    • avoid ice cubes in drinks
    • eat only freshly cooked food
    • avoid non-peelable raw fruit or vegetables
  • Talk to your doctor about getting a Hepatitis A vaccination before travelling.
  • Cook food to a safe internal temperature using a digital thermometer.
  • If you think that you have been exposed to the Hepatitis A virus, see your doctor immediately. Vaccination can prevent the onset of symptoms if given within two weeks of exposure.
  • If you have been diagnosed with Hepatitis A, or any other gastrointestinal illness, do not prepare food or pour water for other people.
  • Also, these safe food practices will reduce your risk of contracting Hepatitis A and other foodborne illnesses.

    Is There A Possibility Of Coinfection

    Both hepatitis B and C can be present at the same time. Hepatitis C may become more dominant, reducing hepatitis B levels in the bloodstream to low or undetectable levels.

    Prior to starting hepatitis C treatment, people should have their blood tested for hepatitis B using the three-part blood test . According to the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases treatment guidelines, people who are currently infected with hepatitis B or who have recovered from a previous infection should be managed carefully to avoid dangerous elevations in liver enzymes that can lead to liver failure.

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    Who Is At Risk For Hepatitis C

    It only takes one exposure to hepatitis C to become chronically infected, so people who have injected illegal drugs even one time or many years previously could have chronic hepatitis C, and not know it since there are often no symptoms. People with blood transfusions prior to 1992 – when they started testing blood for transfusion for hepatitis C – also may have become chronically infected.

    How Do You Treat Hepatitis C

    The A

    When Dr. Fried started treating hepatitis C in 1990, the cure rate was 7 percent. Treatments have evolved since then, leading to a 95 percent cure rate. The treatment course includes taking one to a few pills a day for 12 to 24 weeks, and the medicines have few side effects. Hepatitis C is the only chronic viral infection that you can routinely cure, thanks to these new medicines.

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    Chronic Hepatitis B Treatment

    For hepatitis B, treatment is aimed at controlling the virus and preventing damage to the liver. Antiviral medications are available that will benefit most people, but the medications need to be chosen carefully, and the treatment needs to be monitored in order to assure successful treatment and to prevent or treat medication-related side effects. For some individuals, the risks of treatment may not be justified.

    What Causes Hepatitis A

    Hepatitis A is caused by infection with the hepatitis A virus. You get the virus when you unknowingly eat a small amount of infected feces. This can happen through person-to-person contact, or through eating or drinking contaminated food or water.

    A person can have and spread hepatitis A, even if that person does not have any symptoms. You are most likely to get hepatitis A from another person when:

    • A person who has the virus does not wash their hands properly after going to the bathroom
    • A parent does not wash their hands properly after changing the diaper of an infected child
    • A caregiver does not wash their hands properly after cleaning up the stool of an infected person
    • A person has sex with a person who has the virus

    You can also get infected with hepatitis A by eating contaminated food or drinking contaminated water. Contaminated food and water are more common in developing countries. When traveling in areas where hepatitis A is common, avoid eating raw fruits and vegetables, shellfish, ice, and untreated water.

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    Common Symptoms Of Hav And Hcv

    HAV has an incubation period of 15 to 50 days. Most of the time, the symptoms begin around the 28th day. HCV has an incubation period of 14 to 80 days, but the symptoms become noticeable in about 45 days on average.

    The symptoms of hepatitis A and C are the same. They include:

    • nausea
    • joint pain
    • yellowing of the skin and eyes, or jaundice

    HAV causes an acute infection. The symptoms last a few weeks to a few months, but HAV never becomes chronic.

    HCV can also be an acute infection. When it lasts more than six months, doctors consider it to be a chronic condition that can cause serious complications. Over a span of 20 to 30 years, chronic HCV can cause scarring of the liver, or cirrhosis. This makes it hard for your liver to do its job. HCV increases your risk of developing liver cancer or liver failure. The symptoms are generally worse for people who also have HIV.

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